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The Mill on the Floss
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The Mill on the Floss
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  • This had been the fact once, and Philip was glad of the recollection; it was like an inspiration to enable him to excuse his crying.
  • There was a coarse, dingy man, of whose face Tom had some vague recollection, sitting in his father’s chair, smoking, with a jug and glass beside him.
  • The recollection of that childish time came as a sweet relief to Maggie.
  • "Oh, Bob, it’s you!" said Maggie, starting up with a smile of pleased recognition, for there had been no abundance of kind acts to efface the recollection of Bob’s generosity; "I’m so glad to see you."
  • All the disagreeable recollections of the morning were thick upon her, when Tom, whose displeasure toward her had been considerably refreshed by her foolish trick of causing him to upset his cowslip wine, said, "Here, Lucy, you come along with me," and walked off to the area where the toads were, as if there were no Maggie in existence.
  • Then, when the first burst of unsatisfied anger was gone by, came the recollection of that quiet time before the pleasure which had ended in to-day’s misery had perturbed the clearness and simplicity of her life.
  • "I will bring you the book, shall I, Miss Tulliver?" said Stephen, when he found the stream of his recollections running rather shallow.
  • The walk was finished in silence after this, for Luke had disburthened himself of thoughts to an extent that left his conversational resources quite barren, and Mr. Tulliver had relapsed from his recollections into a painful meditation on the choice of hardships before him.
  • She did not reflect that this sudden action would only add to the embarrassing recollections of the last half-hour.
  • The music was vibrating in her still,—Purcell’s music, with its wild passion and fancy,—and she could not stay in the recollection of that bare, lonely past.
  • Sad recollections crowded on Maggie as she entered the small parlor, which was now all that poor Tom had to call by the name of "home,"—that name which had once, so many years ago, meant for both of them the same sum of dear familiar objects.
  • Maggie was resting her elbow on the table, leaning her head on her hand and looking at Philip with half-penitent dependent affection, as she said this; while he was returning her gaze with an expression that, to her consciousness, gradually became less vague,—became charged with a specific recollection.
  • But the younger generation, who had seen several small floods, thought lightly of these sombre recollections and forebodings; and Bob Jakin, naturally prone to take a hopeful view of his own luck, laughed at his mother when she regretted their having taken a house by the riverside, observing that but for that they would have had no boats, which were the most lucky of possessions in case of a flood that obliged them to go to a distance for food.

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  • I think I recollect that she was away at college that year.
  • I don’t recollect her name, but I’d recognize her.

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