To better see all uses of the word
agitate
in
The Mill on the Floss
please enable javascript.

agitate
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • (These last words were uttered in a tone of sorrowful agitation.
  • Yap agitated his ears and wrinkled his brows, but declined to plunge, trying whether barking would not answer the purpose just as well.
  • With this cutting innuendo, Tom jumped down from his bough, and threw a stone with a "hoigh!" as a friendly attention to Yap, who had also been looking on while the eatables vanished, with an agitation of his ears and feelings which could hardly have been without bitterness.
  • "No, Tom, father didn’t wish it," said Maggie, her anxiety about his feeling helping her to master her agitation.
  • "But my father’s very much vexed, I dare say?" he added, looking at Maggie, and thinking that her agitated face was only part of her girlish way of taking things.
  • "Paid everybody?" he said, with vehement agitation, his face flushing, and his eye lighting up.
  • Her voice was rather agitated as she uttered the last words, but the sound of wheels diverted her thoughts.
  • At this moment Maggie re-entered with her mother, who came in much agitated by the news that her husband was quite himself again.
  • It was not without a leaping of the heart that she caught sight of a small pair of bare legs sticking up, feet uppermost, by the side of a hillock; they seemed something hideously preternatural,—a diabolical kind of fungus; for she was too much agitated at the first glance to see the ragged clothes and the dark shaggy head attached to them.
  • She re-entered the drawing-room still with some excited brightness in her face, but with a sense of proud self-command that defied anything to agitate her.
  • The speaking face told plainly enough that, if there was joy, it was of a very agitating, dubious sort.
  • Mrs. Moss was in too much agitation to resist Mrs. Tulliver’s movement, as she drew her into the parlor automatically, without reflecting that it was hardly kind to take her among so many persons in the first painful moment of arrival.
  • Chapter II The Torn Nest Is Pierced by the Thorns There is something sustaining in the very agitation that accompanies the first shocks of trouble, just as an acute pain is often a stimulus, and produces an excitement which is transient strength.
  • In his present agitation he could decide on nothing; he could only alternate between contradictory intentions.
  • Her mother was in the room, and Maggie, in violent agitation, hurried upstairs that she might read the letter in solitude.
  • It was quite in Maggie’s character to be agitated by vague self-reproach.
  • In the first moment they were both too much agitated to speak; for Stephen had learned from the servant that the others were gone out.
  • "Let me go!" she said, in an agitated tone, flashing an indignant look at him, and trying to get her hands free.
  • But she knew that even if her uncle’s indignation had not closed his house against her, the agitation of such an interview would have been forbidden to Lucy.
  • For a day and a night Philip turned over in his mind with restless agitation all that Lucy had told him in that interview, till he had thoroughly resolved on a course of action.
  • …for Maggie, becoming fascinated, as usual, by a print of Ulysses and Nausicaa, which uncle Pullet had bought as a "pretty Scripture thing," she presently let fall her cake, and in an unlucky movement crushed it beneath her foot,—a source of so much agitation to aunt Pullet and conscious disgrace to Maggie, that she began to despair of hearing the musical snuff-box to-day, till, after some reflection, it occurred to her that Lucy was in high favor enough to venture on asking for a tune.
  • It was not at all agitating to Maggie to see Philip again; she retained her childish gratitude and pity toward him, and remembered his cleverness; and in the early weeks of her loneliness she had continually recalled the image of him among the people who had been kind to her in life, often wishing she had him for a brother and a teacher, as they had fancied it might have been, in their talk together.
  • It was a moment of some agitation to both, though Philip had spent many hours in preparing for it; but like all persons who have passed through life with little expectation of sympathy, he seldom lost his self-control, and shrank with the most sensitive pride from any noticeable betrayal of emotion.
  • Mrs. Tulliver’s blond face seemed aged ten years by the last thirty hours; the poor woman’s mind had been busy divining when her favorite things were being knocked down by the terrible hammer; her heart had been fluttering at the thought that first one thing and then another had gone to be identified as hers in the hateful publicity of the Golden Lion; and all the while she had to sit and make no sign of this inward agitation.
  • She burst out at last in an agitated, almost violent tone: "Mother, how can you talk so; as if you cared only for things with your name on, and not for what has my father’s name too; and to care about anything but dear father himself!
  • "Sister Glegg," said Mrs. Pullet, in a pleading tone, drawing on her gloves again, and stroking the fingers in an agitated manner, "if you’ve got anything disrespectful to say o’ Mr. Carr, I do beg of you as you won’t say it to me.

  • There are no more uses of "agitate" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Our goal is to agitate public unrest, so there will be a cry for change.
  • She gets agitated whenever the topic comes up.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading