To better see all uses of the word
The Mill on the Floss
please enable javascript.

Used In
The Mill on the Floss
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • "Do you like peppermints, young sir?" required only a tacit answer when it was accompanied by a presentation of the article in question.
  • But in that curious compound, the feminine character, it may easily happen that the flavor is unpleasant in spite of excellent ingredients; and a fine systematic stinginess may be accompanied with a seasoning that quite spoils its relish.
  • Maggie felt her heart leap at this subterfuge of Philip’s, and there passed over her face that almost imperceptible shock which accompanies any relief.
  • Mrs. Moss hurried away with her into another room, and expressed to Mrs. Tulliver, who accompanied her, the conviction that the dear child had good reasons for crying; implying that if it was supposed to be the rattle that baby clamored for, she was a misunderstood baby.
  • After a little further discussion as to whether it would not be better for Mrs. Tulliver to accompany them on a visit to sister Glegg, Mrs. Pullet, observing that it was tea-time, turned to reach from a drawer a delicate damask napkin, which she pinned before her in the fashion of an apron.
  • "Thank you, Miss," said Bob, lifting his cap and showing a delighted face, but immediately relieving himself of some accompanying embarrassment by looking down at his dog, and saying in a tone of disgust, "Get out wi’ you, you thunderin’ sawney!"
  • Chapter II The Torn Nest Is Pierced by the Thorns There is something sustaining in the very agitation that accompanies the first shocks of trouble, just as an acute pain is often a stimulus, and produces an excitement which is transient strength.
  • Her mother was to accompany her in the carriage, and household business could not be dispatched hastily by Mrs. Tulliver.
  • She moved her arm from the table, urged to change her position by that positive physical oppression at the heart that sometimes accompanies a sudden mental pang.
  • Her eyes and cheeks had an almost feverish brilliancy; her head was thrown backward, and her hands were clasped with the palms outward, and with that tension of the arms which is apt to accompany mental absorption.
  • There were not many hours in those ten days in which Mr. Stephen Guest was not seated by Lucy’s side, or standing near her at the piano, or accompanying her on some outdoor excursion; his attentions were clearly becoming more assiduous, and that was what every one had expected.
  • When uncultured minds, confined to a narrow range of personal experience, are under the pressure of continued misfortune, their inward life is apt to become a perpetually repeated round of sad and bitter thoughts; the same words, the same scenes, are revolved over and over again, the same mood accompanies them; the end of the year finds them as much what they were at the beginning as if they were machines set to a recurrent series of movements.
  • "No," said Maggie, with simple seriousness, walking on as if she meant Philip to accompany her, "I’m very glad you came, for I wished very much to have an opportunity of speaking to you.

  • There are no more uses of "accompany" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • The nurse accompanied the old woman everywhere.
  • The exact numbers are shown in the accompanying table.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading