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The Mill on the Floss
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yoke -- as in: the yoke of bondage
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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  • It is a wonderful subduer, this need of love,—this hunger of the heart,—as peremptory as that other hunger by which Nature forces us to submit to the yoke, and change the face of the world.
  • There’ll maybe come a time when you may make him feel; it’ll never come to me; I’n got my head under the yoke.
  • The feeblest member of a family—the one who has the least character—is often the merest epitome of the family habits and traditions; and Mrs. Tulliver was a thorough Dodson, though a mild one, as small-beer, so long as it is anything, is only describable as very weak ale: and though she had groaned a little in her youth under the yoke of her elder sisters, and still shed occasional tears at their sisterly reproaches, it was not in Mrs. Tulliver to be an innovator on the family ideas.
  • Mrs. Tulliver, always borne down by the family predominance of sister Jane, who had made her wear the yoke of a younger sister in very tender years, said pleadingly: "I’m sure, sister, I’ve never asked anybody to do anything, only buy things as it ’ud be a pleasure to ’cause to have, so as they mightn’t go and be spoiled i’ strange houses.

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  • They threw off the yoke of slavery.
  • under the yoke of a tyrant

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