To better see all uses of the word
The Mill on the Floss
please enable javascript.

Used In
The Mill on the Floss
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • "No, thank you," said Maggie, summoning all her force for a desperate effort, and trying to smile in a friendly way.
  • But the new images summoned by Philip’s name dispersed half the oppressive spell she had been under.
  • For hours every other thought that she strove to summon was thrust aside by the image of Stephen waiting for the single word that would bring him to her.
  • He was beginning to play very falsely under this deafening inward tumult, and Lucy was looking at him in astonishment, when Mrs. Tulliver’s entrance to summon them to lunch came as an excuse for abruptly breaking off the music.
  • But at last she summoned courage to go and see sister Glegg, who of course would know everything, and had been even to see Tom at the Mill in Mrs. Tulliver’s absence, though he had said nothing of what had passed on the occasion.
  • Still two or three more days passed, and Maggie heard nothing of Philip; anxiety about him was becoming her predominant trouble, and she summoned courage at last to inquire about him of Dr. Kenn, on his next visit to her.
  • …self-confident personage,—not any self-confident personage, but one in particular, who suddenly looks humble and anxious, and lingers, bending still, to ask if there is not some draught in that position between the window and the fireplace, and if he may not be allowed to move the work-table for her,—these things will summon a little of the too ready, traitorous tenderness into a woman’s eyes, compelled as she is in her girlish time to learn her life-lessons in very trivial language.

  • There are no more uses of "summon" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I was summoned to the principal’s office.
  • I summoned all my courage and walked into the room.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading