To better see all uses of the word
repugnant
in
The Mill on the Floss
please enable javascript.

repugnant
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • He had seated himself again, and as he drew, was thinking what he could say to Tom, and trying to overcome his own repugnance to making the first advances.
  • Tom’s was a nature which had a sort of superstitious repugnance to everything exceptional.
  • He told himself so; and yet he had once or twice felt a certain savage resistance, and at another moment a shuddering repugnance, to this intrusion of Philip’s image, which almost made it a new incitement to rush toward Maggie and claim her for himself.
  • Hearing the door open, she thought Mrs. Jakin was coming in with her supper, as usual; and with that repugnance to trivial speech which comes with languor and wretchedness, she shrank from turning round and saying she wanted nothing; good little Mrs. Jakin would be sure to make some well-meant remarks.
  • All people of broad, strong sense have an instinctive repugnance to the men of maxims; because such people early discern that the mysterious complexity of our life is not to be embraced by maxims, and that to lace ourselves up in formulas of that sort is to repress all the divine promptings and inspirations that spring from growing insight and sympathy.
  • Other feelings added their force to produce Tom’s bitter repugnance to Philip, and to Maggie’s union with him; and notwithstanding Lucy’s power over her strong-willed cousin, she got nothing but a cold refusal ever to sanction such a marriage; "but of course Maggie could do as she liked,—she had declared her determination to be independent.

  • There are no more uses of "repugnant" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • Her behavior is shocking and repugnant.
  • She does not further her cause with such irresponsible, insulting, and repugnant language.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading