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The Mill on the Floss
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The Mill on the Floss
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  •   "I’m not going to stay a minute longer in this house. ..."
      "Dear heart, dear heart!" said Mr. Glegg in a melancholy tone, as he followed his wife out of the room.
  • "Go and speak to your aunts and uncles, my dears," said Mrs. Tulliver, looking anxious and melancholy.
  • Mrs. Pullet rose with a melancholy air and unlocked one wing of a very bright wardrobe, where you may have hastily supposed she would find a new bonnet.
  • Mr. Tulliver took a draught, swallowed it slowly, and shook his head in a melancholy manner, conscious of exemplifying the truth that a perfectly sane intellect is hardly at home in this insane world.
  • Aunt Pullet half-opened the shutter and then unlocked the wardrobe, with a melancholy deliberateness which was quite in keeping with the funereal solemnity of the scene.
  • She began slowly to adjust the trimmings, in preparation for returning it to its place in the wardrobe, and her thoughts seemed to have taken a melancholy turn, for she shook her head.
  • Still, no face could be more unlike that ugly tailor’s than this melancholy boy’s face,—the brown hair round it waved and curled at the ends like a girl’s; Tom thought that truly pitiable.
  • But Maggie, gifted with that superior power of misery which distinguishes the human being, and places him at a proud distance from the most melancholy chimpanzee, sat still on her bough, and gave herself up to the keen sense of unmerited reproach.
  • He checked his horse, and made it stand still in the same spot for two or three minutes, during which he turned his head from side to side in a melancholy way, as if he were looking at some painful object on more sides than one.
  • "I doubt it’s the water got on his brain," said aunt Pullet, turning round from adjusting her cap in a melancholy way at the pier-glass.
  • "Sarvant, Master Tom," said he of the red locks, with a smile which seemed to break through a self-imposed air of melancholy.
  • He might still be melancholy, as he always used to be, and like her to look at him kindly.
  • Under all this grim melancholy and narrowing concentration of desire, Mr. Tulliver retained the feeling toward his "little wench" which made her presence a need to him, though it would not suffice to cheer him.
  • It is melancholy, but true, that Mr. Pullet had the most confused idea of a bishop as a sort of a baronet, who might or might not be a clergyman; and as the rector of his own parish was a man of high family and fortune, the idea that a clergyman could be a schoolmaster was too remote from Mr. Pullet’s experience to be readily conceivable.
  • The shaking of hands was a melancholy and silent ceremony, till uncle Pullet observed, as Tom approached him: "Well, young sir, we’ve been talking as we should want your pen and ink; you can write rarely now, after all your schooling, I should think."
  • The masculine mind of St. Ogg’s smiled pleasantly, and did not wonder that Kenn liked to see a fine pair of eyes daily, or that he was inclined to take so lenient a view of the past; the feminine mind, regarded at that period as less powerful, took a more melancholy view of the case.
  • A large low room with a sanded floor; a cold scent of tobacco, modified by undetected beer-dregs; Mr. Dickison leaning against the door-post with a melancholy pimpled face, looking as irrelevant to the daylight as a last night’s guttered candle,—all this may not seem a very seductive form of temptation; but the majority of men in Basset found it fatally alluring when encountered on their road toward four o’clock on a wintry afternoon; and if any wife in Basset wished to indicate that…
  • …and insects, which, so far as he had heard, had never before attracted human observation; and he noticed remarkable coincidences between these zoological phenomena and the great events of that time,—as, for example, that before the burning of York Minster there had been mysterious serpentine marks on the leaves of the rose-trees, together with an unusual prevalence of slugs, which he had been puzzled to know the meaning of, until it flashed upon him with this melancholy conflagration.
  • I doubt they’ll outgrow their strength," she added, looking over their heads, with a melancholy expression, at their mother.

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  • Since her dog died she’s been in a melancholy mood.
  • This weather makes me melancholy. I can’t wait for spring,

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