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indignant
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The Mill on the Floss
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indignant
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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  • The indignant fire in her eyes was quenched, and she began to look at him with timid distress.
  • "I’m sure I haven’t, father," said Tom, indignantly.
  • Mrs. Pullet was silent, having to finish her crying, and rather flattered than indignant at being upbraided for crying too much.
  • "No, you couldn’t," said Tom, indignantly.
  • "I don’t know what he could have against the lad," said Mrs. Tulliver, with a slight touch of motherly indignation; "a nice fresh-skinned lad as anybody need wish to see."
  • Glegg," said Mrs. G., in a tone which implied that her indignation would fizz and ooze a little, though she was determined to keep it corked up, "you’d far better hold your tongue.
  • No; Dix, Mr. Tulliver considered, had been as good as nowhere in point of law; and in the intensity of his indignation against Pivart, his contempt for a baffled adversary like Dix began to wear the air of a friendly attachment.
  • "Ah, but you wouldn’t say they looked like fools when they landed a big pike, I can tell you," said Tom, who had never caught anything that was "big" in his life, but whose imagination was on the stretch with indignant zeal for the honor of sport.
  • "No," said Tom indignantly.
  • Maggie, on the contrary, after her momentary delight in Tom’s speech, had relapsed into her state of trembling indignation.
  • He, meanwhile, felt the impetus of his indignation diverted toward Philip.
  • Maggie went up to her own room to pour out all that indignant remonstrance, against which Tom’s mind was close barred, in bitter tears.
  • This was not to be borne; and Maggie jumped up from her stool, forgetting all about her heavy book, which fell with a bang within the fender, and going up between her father’s knees, said, in a half-crying, half-indignant voice,— "Father, Tom wouldn’t be naughty to you ever; I know he wouldn’t."
  • Maggie, looking on attentively, felt that there was some painful mystery about her aunt’s bonnet which she was considered too young to understand; indignantly conscious, all the while, that she could have understood that, as well as everything else, if she had been taken into confidence.
  • "But," he added, his voice trembling with indignation, "while I have been contriving and working that my father may have some peace of mind before he dies,—working for the respectability of our family,—you have done all you can to destroy both."
  • He paused, trembling and white with disgust and indignation.
  • "Let me go!" she said, in an agitated tone, flashing an indignant look at him, and trying to get her hands free.
  • But she knew that even if her uncle’s indignation had not closed his house against her, the agitation of such an interview would have been forbidden to Lucy.
  • If she had felt that she was entirely wrong, and that Tom had been entirely right, she could sooner have recovered more inward harmony; but now her penitence and submission were constantly obstructed by resentment that would present itself to her no otherwise than as a just indignation.
  • The roach necessarily abhors the mode in which the pike gets his living, and the pike is likely to think nothing further even of the most indignant roach than that he is excellent good eating; it could only be when the roach choked him that the pike could entertain a strong personal animosity.
  • And Tom was very unhappy; he felt the humiliation as well as the prospective hardships of his lot with all the keenness of a proud nature; and with all his resolute dutifulness toward his father there mingled an irrepressible indignation against him which gave misfortune the less endurable aspect of a wrong.
  • His natural inclination to blame, hitherto kept entirely in abeyance toward his father by the predisposition to think him always right, simply on the ground that he was Tom Tulliver’s father, was turned into this new channel by his mother’s plaints; and with his indignation against Wakem there began to mingle some indignation of another sort.
  • His natural inclination to blame, hitherto kept entirely in abeyance toward his father by the predisposition to think him always right, simply on the ground that he was Tom Tulliver’s father, was turned into this new channel by his mother’s plaints; and with his indignation against Wakem there began to mingle some indignation of another sort.
  • Formerly they had not altogether delighted in the contemplated match with Lucy, but now their dread of a marriage between Stephen and Maggie added its momentum to their genuine pity and indignation on behalf of the gentle forsaken girl, in making them desire that he should return to her.
  • Uncles and aunts were almost unanimously of opinion that such an offer ought not to be rejected when there was nothing in the way but a feeling in Mr. Tulliver’s mind, which, as neither aunts nor uncles shared it, was regarded as entirely unreasonable and childish,—indeed, as a transferring toward Wakem of that indignation and hatred which Mr. Tulliver ought properly to have directed against himself for his general quarrelsomeness, and his special exhibition of it in going to law.
  • "No, sir," said Bob, rather indignantly; "I didn’t offer to get a apple for Mr. Tom, o’ purpose to hev a bite out of it myself.
  • "Sophy!" said Mrs. Glegg, with indignant disgust, "you do talk o’ people’s complaints till it’s quite undecent.

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  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

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