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haughty
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The Mill on the Floss
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haughty
Used In
The Mill on the Floss
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  • "That’s nonsense!" said Maggie, tossing her head haughtily, and turning away, with the tears springing in her eyes.
  • I am afraid he hated Mrs. Stelling, and contracted a lasting dislike to pale blond ringlets and broad plaits, as directly associated with haughtiness of manner, and a frequent reference to other people’s "duty."
  • "What do you mean?" answered Philip, haughtily.
  • "Leave me to myself, if you please," she said, with impetuous haughtiness, "and for the future avoid me."
  • Good Mrs. Moss, rather nervous in the presence of this apparently haughty gentleman, was inwardly wondering whether she would be doing right or wrong to invite him again to leave his horse and walk in, when Maggie, feeling all the embarrassment of the situation, and unable to say anything, put on her bonnet, and turned to walk toward the gate.
  • Maggie paused a moment; then, determined to make an end of Tom’s right to accuse her of deceit, she said haughtily: "No, not quite all.
  • "Tulliver," said Wakem, abruptly, in a haughtier tone than usual, "what a fool’s trick you did,—spreading those hard lumps on that Far Close!
  • Not a word was spoken till they were out in the lane, and had walked four or five yards, when Maggie, who had been looking straight before her all the while, turned again to walk back, saying, with haughty resentment,— "There is no need for me to go any farther.

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  • It is a story about a haughty princess who has a great fall.
  • She has that haughty, rich and entitled attitude.

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