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The Mill on the Floss
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The Mill on the Floss
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  • "Don’t you ask it, mum," said Bob, entreatingly.
  • But uncle Pullet, when entreated to exhibit his accomplishment, never depreciated it by a too-ready consent.
  • His very fingers sent entreating thrills that he would go and clutch that familiar rough buck’s-horn handle, which they had so often grasped for mere affection, as it lay idle in his pocket.
  • Tom turned his cheek passively to meet her entreating kisses, and there gathered a moisture in his eyes, which he just rubbed away with his hand.
  • Maggie burst out entreatingly; "it’s a very long while since all that; you’ve been ill a great many weeks,—more than two months; everything is changed."
  • This was said in an entreating voice, and it would have been very hard of Maggie to refuse.
  • "Do keep it, Maggie," said Philip, entreatingly; "it will give you pleasure."
  • "Well, then," said he, turning quickly round and fixing his gray eyes entreatingly on her face, "I should be contented to live, if you would let me see you sometimes."
  • She could never have guessed what she had done to make Maggie angry with her; but she felt that Maggie was very unkind and disagreeable, and made no magnanimous entreaties to Tom that he would not "tell," only running along by his side and crying piteously, while Maggie sat on the roots of the tree and looked after them with her small Medusa face.
  • "Yes, Philip," she said, looking at him pleadingly, as if she entreated him to believe that she was compelled to this course.
  • "Then, dearest, look at me," said Stephen, in deepest, tenderest tones of entreaty.
  • First, he thought he must have an interview with Maggie, and entreat her to confide in him; then, again, he distrusted his own interference.
  • He sat down again, taking her hand in his, and looking at her with passionate entreaty.
  • "Take my arm," said Stephen, entreatingly; and she took it, feeling all the while as if she were sliding downward in a nightmare.
  • "Say’ve s’ dearest," said Stephen, leaning to look entreatingly in her face.
  • "Let us go," Stephen murmured entreatingly, rising, and taking her hand to raise her too.
  • "You look so pale," Stephen insisted, in a more entreating tone.
  • But at last she heard the word "dearest" uttered in the softest tone of pained entreaty, like that of a patient who asks for something that ought to have been given without asking.
  • The gray eyes that had so often looked up at her with entreating worship, looked up at her now, with a last struggling ray of hope in them, and Maggie met them with her large sincere gaze.
  • The last feeling surmounted every other; to be by her side again and entreat forgiveness was the only thing that had the force of a motive for him, and she had not been seated more than a few minutes when he came and stood humbly before her.
  • Maggie had no sooner uttered this entreaty than she was wretched at the admission it implied; but Stephen turned away at once, and following her upward glance, he saw Philip Wakem sealed in the half-hidden corner, so that he could command little more than that angle of the hall in which Maggie sat.
  • Maggie, feeling the need of a footstool, was walking across the room to get one, when Stephen, who was not singing just then, and was conscious of all her movements, guessed her want, and flew to anticipate her, lifting the footstool with an entreating look at her, which made it impossible not to return a glance of gratitude.
  • Say you love him," she added entreatingly.

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  • She flattered and entreated him until he agreed to help.
  • She was unmoved by his entreaties.

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