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dubious
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The Mill on the Floss
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dubious
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The Mill on the Floss
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  • Chapter IV Another Love-Scene Early in the following April, nearly a year after that dubious parting you have just witnessed, you may, if you like, again see Maggie entering the Red Deeps through the group of Scotch firs.
  • English sunshine is dubious; bonnets are never quite secure; and if you sit down on the grass, it may lead to catarrhs.
  • The speaking face told plainly enough that, if there was joy, it was of a very agitating, dubious sort.
  • Maggie in her crude form, with her hair down her back, and altogether in a state of dubious promise, was a most undesirable niece; but now she was capable of being at once ornamental and useful.
  • Tom saw no reason why they should not make up this quarrel as they had done many others, by behaving as if nothing had happened; for though he had never before said to Philip that his father was a rogue, this idea had so habitually made part of his feeling as to the relation between himself and his dubious schoolfellow, who he could neither like nor dislike, that the mere utterance did not make such an epoch to him as it did to Philip.
  • His experience told him that intervention was too dubious a responsibility to be lightly incurred; the possible issue either of an endeavor to restore the former relations with Lucy and Philip, or of counselling submission to this irruption of a new feeling, was hidden in a darkness all the more impenetrable because each immediate step was clogged with evil.
  • Too ’cute for a woman, I’m afraid," continued Mr. Tulliver, turning his head dubiously first on one side and then on the other.
  • He would perhaps not so thoroughly have understood all the dubiousness of Maggie’s appearance with Mr. Stephen Guest on the quay at Mudport if he had not witnessed the effect it produced on Tom when he went to report it; and since then, the circumstances which in any case gave a disastrous character to her elopement had passed beyond the more polite circles of St. Ogg’s, and had become matter of common talk, accessible to the grooms and errand-boys.

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  • She was dubious, but agreed to come with us anyway.
  • She has a dubious reputation. I wouldn’t count on her.

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