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The Mill on the Floss
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The Mill on the Floss
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  • There was no attitude in which his pride did not feel its bruises; and in all behavior toward him, whether kind or cold, he detected an allusion to the change in his circumstances.
  • But she was suddenly subdued by Mr. Stelling’s alluding to a little girl of whom he had heard that she once ran away to the gypsies.
  • Maggie was rather awe-stricken by this unusual treatment, and sometimes thought that her conduct had been too wicked to be alluded to.
  • There was a rustling demonstration of surprise in the company, such as you may have observed in a country congregation when they hear an allusion to their week-day affairs from the pulpit.
  • I despise the feelings you have shown in speaking to Philip; I detest your insulting, unmanly allusions to his deformity.
  • So if Mrs. Glegg’s front to-day was more fuzzy and lax than usual, she had a design under it: she intended the most pointed and cutting allusion to Mrs. Tulliver’s bunches of blond curls, separated from each other by a due wave of smoothness on each side of the parting.
  • Philip colored; he had meant to imply, would she love him as well in spite of his deformity, and yet when she alluded to it so plainly, he winced under her pity.
  • Maggie had started up from the sofa at the allusion to her father, but Tom saw her action and flushed face in time to prevent her from speaking.
  • He shrank with proud delicacy from the faintest allusion to the words of love, of plighted love that had passed between them.
  • She took up her work and occupied herself resolutely, while Philip watched her, really in doubt whether she had anything more than this general allusion in her mind.
  • Her feeling under his words was complicated by the allusion to the last scene between her father and Wakem; and at length that painful, solemn memory surmounted the immediate grievance.
  • It was only a wonder that there was no tinge of vulgarity about her, considering what the rest of poor Lucy’s relations were—an allusion which always made the Miss Guests shudder a little.
  • Stephen was continually, through the morning, expressing his anxiety at the fatigue and discomfort she was suffering, and alluded to landing and to the change of motion and repose she would have in a carriage, wanting to assure himself more completely by presupposing that everything would be as he had arranged it.
  • He made his speech, asserting his honest principles with his old confident eagerness, alluding to the rascals and the luck that had been against him, but that he had triumphed over, to some extent, by hard efforts and the aid of a good son; and winding up with the story of how Tom had got the best part of the needful money.
  • …market dinner-table, the attorneys’ clients were not a whit inclined to withdraw their business from him; and if, when Wakem himself happened to be present, some jocose cattle-feeder, stimulated by opportunity and brandy, made a thrust at him by alluding to old ladies’ wills, he maintained perfect sang froid, and knew quite well that the majority of substantial men then present were perfectly contented with the fact that "Wakem was Wakem"; that is to say, a man who always knew the…
  • Philip winced under this allusion to his unfitness for active sports, and he answered almost peevishly,— "I can’t bear fishing.
  • Poulter," Tom would say, at any allusion to the sword, "I wish you’d bring your sword and do the sword-exercise!"

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  • He alluded to Susan without mentioning her name.
  • She didn’t mention any names, but everyone knew she was alluding to the President.

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