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resolution
in
The Count of Monte Cristo
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resolution
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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unspecified meaning
  • "Before Mercedes should die," replied Fernand, with the accents of unshaken resolution, "I would die myself!"
  • It was not want of courage that prevented her putting this resolution into execution; but her religious feelings came to her aid and saved her.

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  • It was the last yearning for life contending with the resolution of despair; then his dungeon seemed less sombre, his prospects less desperate.
  • He then formed a resolution.
  • He advanced towards the angle, and summoning all his resolution, attacked the ground with the pickaxe.
  • Another, older and less strong than he, had attempted what he had not had sufficient resolution to undertake, and had failed only because of an error in calculation.
  • During these hours of profound meditation, which to him had seemed only minutes, he had formed a fearful resolution, and bound himself to its fulfilment by a solemn oath.
  • He had read in the countenances of Luigi and Teresa their steadfast resolution not to surrender him, and he drew from his pocket a purse full of gold, which he offered to them.
  • He was a fine, tall, slim young fellow of eighteen or twenty, with black eyes, and hair as dark as a raven’s wing; and his whole appearance bespoke that calmness and resolution peculiar to men accustomed from their cradle to contend with danger.
  • The invalid’s eye remained fixed, by which expression he intended to intimate that his resolution was unalterable.

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  • Nothing, sir; it is a resolution which my father has taken and I know he never alters his mind.
  • Has your resolution changed, Valentine?
  • How great is the power of a woman who has made so courageous a resolution!
  • He had formed his resolution.
  • When he learned my resolution, I shall never forget the reproachful look which he cast on me, and the tears of utter despair which chased each other down his lifeless cheeks.
  • You might some time ago have looked upon this resolution as a vague project, but to-day you see it was a reality, and you must submit to it under penalty of breaking your word.
  • "However"— "My resolution, sir, is unchangeable, but you have only to search for yourself and you will find, alas, but too many objects upon whom to exercise your benevolence."
  • He has shown very great courage and resolution, for he exposed his own life to stop the horses that were running away with us, and would certainly have dashed the carriage to pieces.
  • "This was our resolution; a cabriolet was in waiting at the gate, in which I intended to carry off Valentine to my sister’s house, to marry her, and to wait respectfully M. de Villefort’s pardon."
  • When such resolutions are made, Albert, they should be promptly executed.
  • Oh, do not say so; it will break my resolutions.
  • I know his character; he is inflexible in any resolutions formed for his own interests.
  • In reality, when you have once devoted your life to your enterprises, you are no longer the equal of other men, or, rather, other men are no longer your equals, and whosoever has taken this resolution, feels his strength and resources doubled.
  • I maintain my original resolution.
  • It was evident from his pale face and knit brows that his resolution to revenge himself was growing weaker.
  • All these proofs of an energetic resolution, which Albert did not fear on his own account, alarmed him for his mother.
  • But, since our resolution is formed, let us act promptly.
  • It was not fatigue that stayed Andrea here; it was that he might form some resolution, adopt some plan.
  • Ten minutes after he raised his head; his resolution was made.
  • My friend, my dear Maximilian, do not make a hasty resolution, I entreat you.
  • "I make a hasty resolution?" said Morrel, shrugging his shoulders; "is there anything extraordinary in a journey?"
  • His resolution not to sign lasted two days, after which he offered a million for some food.
  • One day, in a moment of despair like yours, since it led to a similar resolution, I also wished to kill myself; one day your father, equally desperate, wished to kill himself too.
  • "Oh, my mother!" exclaimed Albert, so overcome he could scarcely speak; "it is not the same with you and me—you cannot have made the same resolution I have, for I have come to warn you that I bid adieu to your house, and—and to you."
  • "Sir," said the count, "the world, unjust as it is, will be pleased with your resolution; your friends will be proud of you, and M. d’Epinay, even if he took Mademoiselle de Villefort without any dowry, which he will not do, would be delighted with the idea of entering a family which could make such sacrifices in order to keep a promise and fulfil a duty."
  • From his past life, from his resolution to shrink from nothing, the count had acquired an inconceivable relish for the contests in which he had engaged, sometimes against nature, that is to say, against God, and sometimes against the world, that is, against the devil.
  • The oval face was lengthened, his smiling mouth had assumed the firm and marked lines which betoken resolution; his eyebrows were arched beneath a brow furrowed with thought; his eyes were full of melancholy, and from their depths occasionally sparkled gloomy fires of misanthropy and hatred; his complexion, so long kept from the sun, had now that pale color which produces, when the features are encircled with black hair, the aristocratic beauty of the man of the north; the profound…
  • Without giving himself time to reconsider his decision, and, indeed, that he might not allow his thoughts to be distracted from his desperate resolution, he bent over the appalling shroud, opened it with the knife which Faria had made, drew the corpse from the sack, and bore it along the tunnel to his own chamber, laid it on his couch, tied around its head the rag he wore at night around his own, covered it with his counterpane, once again kissed the ice-cold brow, and tried vainly to…
  • This letter" (as he spoke, Maximilian drew a letter from the purse and gave it to the count)—"this letter was written by him the day that my father had taken a desperate resolution, and this diamond was given by the generous unknown to my sister as her dowry."
  • No, the sound of a bell, announcing a visitor, will but accelerate the resolution of one in Maximilian’s situation, and then the bell would be followed by a louder noise."
  • You have known me long enough," continued Albert, biting his lips convulsively, for he saw that Beauchamp’s anger was beginning to rise,—"you have been my friend, and therefore sufficiently intimate with me to be aware that I am likely to maintain my resolution on this point."

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a New Year's resolution Define
a firm decision to do something
as in: a United Nations resolution Define
a formal expression of opinion arrived at by a group vote
as in: Her resolution weakened. Define
determination
as in: a dispute resolution fund Define
a solution or outcome
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