To better see all uses of the word
minuteness
in
The Count of Monte Cristo
please enable javascript.

minuteness
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • They halted for a minute, during which he strove to collect his thoughts.
  • The fourth and last side of your cell faces on—faces on—stop a minute, now where does it face?

  • Show more
  • If you wish me to enter upon the more difficult part of the business, you must assist me by the most minute information on every point.
  • ’That’s the example you set, Penelon,’ cries the captain; ’very well, wait a minute.’
  • The minute hand moved on.
  • Is not a day divided into twenty-four hours, each hour into sixty minutes, and every minute sub-divided into sixty seconds?
  • The next minute Franz heard himself called by Albert, who made the lofty building re-echo with the sound of his friend’s name.
  • Oh, I expect him every minute.
  • When I ring once, it is for my valet; twice, for my majordomo; thrice, for my steward,—thus I do not waste a minute or a word.
  • Your orders do not forbid your telling me what I must know in ten minutes, in half an hour, or an hour.

  • Show more again
  • They waited upwards of ten minutes.
  • I will but go and return, sire; I shall be back in ten minutes.
  • Ten minutes afterwards Villefort reached his hotel, ordered horses to be ready in two hours, and asked to have his breakfast brought to him.
  • Three days passed—seventy-two long tedious hours which he counted off by minutes!
  • He waited ten minutes, a quarter of an hour, half an hour,—no change took place.
  • At seven o’clock in the evening all was ready, and at ten minutes past seven they doubled the lighthouse just as the beacon was kindled.
  • After ten minutes’ labor the wall gave way, and a hole large enough to insert the arm was opened.
  • Five minutes after, it was down; and we sailed under mizzen-tops’ls and to’gall’nt sails.
  • Ten minutes after she pitched forward, then the other way, spun round and round, and then good-by to the Pharaon.
  • Morrel fell back in his chair, his eyes fixed on the clock; there were seven minutes left, that was all.
  • Then he turned again to the clock, counting time now not by minutes, but by seconds.
  • At the end of ten minutes the vessel begins to roll heavily and settle down.
  • In ten minutes Luigi and the traveller reached the cross-roads.
  • At the end of ten minutes the bandit made them a sign to stop.
  • Is not a day divided into twenty-four hours, each hour into sixty minutes, and every minute sub-divided into sixty seconds?
  • Only a few minutes ago they brought me the tavolettas.
  • At ten minutes past five Albert entered overjoyed.
  • Every five minutes Albert took out his watch; at length it pointed to seven.
  • Its agent, who will in ten minutes present himself to receive the amount of a bill of 287,500 francs, I will not say granted, but offered me three months.
  • He heard hasty steps, the creaking of a door, people going and coming, and some minutes afterwards a turnkey entered, saying,— "Here is the brazier, lighted."
  • During these hours of profound meditation, which to him had seemed only minutes, he had formed a fearful resolution, and bound himself to its fulfilment by a solemn oath.
  • Now, as a quarter-past one has already struck, I do not consider I have asserted too much in saying, that, in another hour and thirty minutes Mercedes will have become Madame Dantes.
  • "We did better than that, sir," said the old sailor respectfully; "we put the helm up to run before the tempest; ten minutes after we struck our tops’ls and scudded under bare poles."
  • "I beg your excellency’s pardon for keeping you waiting," said the man, in the Roman dialect, "but I don’t think I’m many minutes after my time, ten o’clock has just struck on the Lateran."
  • At the end of ten minutes fifty thousand lights glittered, descending from the Palazzo di Venezia to the Piazza del Popolo, and mounting from the Piazzo del Popolo to the Palazzo di Venezia.
  • "Stop a minute," answered Caderousse; "we might be interrupted in the most interesting part of my story, which would be a pity; and it is as well that your visit hither should be made known only to ourselves."
  • "There shall not be one a minute longer than you please," said Dantes, who had followed the working of his thoughts as accurately as though his brain were enclosed in crystal so clear as to display its minutest operations.
  • No, for I think he never liked me since the day when I was silly enough, after a little quarrel we had, to propose to him to stop for ten minutes at the island of Monte Cristo to settle the dispute—a proposition which I was wrong to suggest, and he quite right to refuse.
  • Pere Pamphile had seen Dantes pass not ten minutes before; and assured that he was at the Catalans, they sat down under the budding foliage of the planes and sycamores, in the branches of which the birds were singing their welcome to one of the first days of spring.
  • These horrible chills, which make my teeth chatter and seem to dislocate my bones, begin to pervade my whole frame; in five minutes the malady will reach its height, and in a quarter of an hour there will be nothing left of me but a corpse.
  • Dantes led the owner of the yacht to the dwelling of a Jew; retired with the latter for a few minutes to a small back parlor, and upon their return the Jew counted out to the shipbuilder the sum of sixty thousand francs in bright gold pieces.
  • "One minute," cried Albert, without giving Monte Cristo the time to reply.
  • And at the same minute a carriage with smoking horses, accompanied by two mounted gentlemen, arrived at the gate, which opened before them.
  • He drew up for a minute, threw a rapid glance around him, and then his hand fell instantly into his pocket, where it began playing with a pistol.
  • Cornelie obeyed, and the next minute Madame Danglars left her room in a charming loose dress, and came and sat down close to Debray.
  • A minute after the door by which the priest had entered reopened, and Monte Cristo appeared.
  • The distance was short, and at the end of ten minutes his carriage, or rather the count’s, stopped before the Hotel de Londres.
  • Signor Pastrini did as he was desired, and returning five minutes after, he said,—"The count awaits your excellency."
  • "In ten minutes," said the count to his companion, "we shall be there."
  • You, whom I expected last, you arrive at five minutes to ten, when the time fixed was half-past!
  • "Oh, you will give me five minutes’ grace," replied Morcerf, "for I also expect a preserver."
  • "Well, with the five minutes’ grace, we have only ten left."
  • Ten minutes after one is taken, the effect is produced.
  • She will, however, be in the salon in ten minutes.
  • "His manners are admirable," said the countess, "at least, as far as I could judge in the few minutes he remained here."
  • After having sought for a few minutes, he stopped at a leaf which had several notes, and compared them with the deed of sale, which lay on the table.
  • In twenty minutes they were at Auteuil; the steward’s emotion had continued to augment as they entered the village.
  • You no doubt observed the horses standing a few minutes since at the door?
  • In a very few minutes the count reached No. 7 in the Rue Meslay.
  • Julie, suitably dressed, and her hair arranged (she had accomplished this feat in less than ten minutes), received the count on his entrance.
  • Five minutes afterwards the curtain falls, and the spectators depart.
  • In a few minutes Valentine re-entered the garden alone.
  • True, we must be quick, for we have scarcely ten minutes more to pass together.
  • I left him about five minutes ago, and he is now occupied in dictating his will to two notaries.
  • "You will see," said the man proudly; "in five minutes he will speak."
  • Five minutes after the new telegram reached the minister, Debray had the horses put to his carriage, and drove to Danglars’ house.
  • Five minutes afterwards the doors of the drawing-room were thrown open, and Bertuccio appearing said, with a violent effort, "The dinner waits."
  • After ten minutes’ expectation the clock struck ten; at the fifth stroke the door opened and Lord Wilmore appeared.
  • "Well, sir," said Madame de Saint-Meran, after a few minutes’ reflection, "I must hasten the marriage, for I have but a short time to live."
  • Perhaps I turned pale and trembled, but certainly I smiled; and five minutes after I left, without having heard one word that had passed.
  • Morrel began again to breathe freely, which he had not done during the last ten minutes.
  • Madame de Saint-Meran had three successive attacks, at intervals of some minutes, each one more serious than the former.
  • After having stood a few minutes in the cavern, the atmosphere of which was rather warm than damp, Dantes’ eye, habituated as it was to darkness, could pierce even to the remotest angles of the cavern, which was of granite that sparkled like diamonds.
  • Gaetano consulted with his companions, and after five minutes’ discussion a manoeuvre was executed which caused the vessel to tack about, they returned the way they had come, and in a few minutes the fire disappeared, hidden by an elevation of the land.
  • Gaetano consulted with his companions, and after five minutes’ discussion a manoeuvre was executed which caused the vessel to tack about, they returned the way they had come, and in a few minutes the fire disappeared, hidden by an elevation of the land.
  • He gave a ball every year, at which he appeared for a quarter of an hour only,—that is to say, five and forty minutes less than the king is visible at his balls.
  • Now, the cabbage had not the slightest appearance of disease in the world, and the rabbit had not the smallest distrust; yet, five minutes afterwards, the rabbit was dead.
  • "Mademoiselle," said he, "you have a sacred duty to fulfil in your deceased grandmother’s room, will you allow me the honor of a few minutes’ conversation with M. Noirtier?"
  • "Sir," suddenly exclaimed the countess, after their walk had continued ten minutes in silence, "is it true that you have seen so much, travelled so far, and suffered so deeply?"
  • Well, what does it signify, Valentine, so long as I am satisfied, and feel that even this long and painful suspense is amply repaid by five minutes of your society, or two words from your lips?
  • A minute afterwards the blinds were thrown open, and through the jessamine and clematis that overhung the window one could see the garden ornamented with lanterns, and the supper laid under the tent.
  • Three hours later, the man returned covered with dust, his errand was performed, and two minutes after, another man on foot, muffled in a mantle, opened the little door of the garden, which he closed after him.
  • Soon the water rushes out of the scupper-holes like a whale spouting, the vessel gives a last groan, spins round and round, and disappears, forming a vast whirlpool in the ocean, and then all is over, so that in five minutes nothing but the eye of God can see the vessel where she lies at the bottom of the sea.
  • Then, turning to Monte Cristo,—"I hope you will permit me to leave you for a few minutes," continued she; and without awaiting any reply, disappeared behind a clump of trees, and escaped to the house by a lateral alley.
  • In ten minutes after the strangers had departed, Franz was on the road to the Piazza de Spagni, listening with studied indifference to the learned dissertation delivered by Albert, after the manner of Pliny and Calpurnius, touching the iron-pointed nets used to prevent the ferocious beasts from springing on the spectators.
  • As the envoy of the prefect of police arrived ten minutes before ten, he was told that Lord Wilmore, who was precision and punctuality personified, was not yet come in, but that he would be sure to return as the clock struck.
  • Then, should anything appear to merit a more minute examination, Albert de Morcerf could follow up his researches by means of a small gate, similar to that close to the concierge’s door, and which merits a particular description.
  • Nevertheless, had Caderousse but retained his post a few minutes longer, he might have caught a dim outline of something approaching from the direction of Bellegarde; as the moving object drew nearer, he would easily have perceived that it consisted of a man and horse, between whom the kindest and most amiable understanding appeared to exist.
  • Edmond, at the approach of his patron, respectfully placed the arm of his affianced bride within that of M. Morrel, who, forthwith conducting her up the flight of wooden steps leading to the chamber in which the feast was prepared, was gayly followed by the guests, beneath whose heavy tread the slight structure creaked and groaned for the space of several minutes.
  • Yes, look at yourself in that glass; you have turned pale and then red successively, three or four times in one minute.
  • At the same minute, one of the little windows of the Hotel de Ville was thrown open, and the head of a gendarme appeared.
  • It is impossible to describe the sensations experienced by Valentine during the minute and a half Madame de Villefort remained in the room.
  • Immediately afterwards the light expired, and the room was plunged in frightful obscurity, while the clock at that minute struck half-past four.
  • In a minute the young man darted through several rooms, till at length he reached Valentine’s.
  • After finishing that calculation, I had a minute’s hope.
  • "You have my promise," he said, after a minute’s pause, extending his hand to Monte Cristo.
  • General d’Epinay died five minutes after.’
  • Both men entered Monte Cristo’s carriage, which in the course of a few minutes deposited them safely at No. 30.
  • Five minutes after, Andrea left the hotel, completely disguised, took a cabriolet, and ordered the driver to take him to the Cheval Rouge, at Picpus.
  • Ten minutes passed thus, and he was convinced that no one was watching him.
  • He left the room, and returned in five minutes with a phial.
  • Five minutes had sufficed to make a complete transformation in his appearance.
  • At ten minutes to eight Beauchamp arrived; he had seen Chateau-Renaud, who had promised to be in the orchestra before the curtain was raised.
  • Then he stepped into his coupe, calm and smiling, and was at home in five minutes.
  • Morrel was there; he had come twenty minutes before the time appointed.
  • "Let us go," said he; "it is five minutes past seven, and the appointment was for eight o’clock."
  • "It is only five minutes past eight," said he to Morrel; "there is not much time lost yet."
  • Albert is ten minutes after time.
  • He remained there ten minutes, motionless and dumb, listening to the beating of his own heart.
  • For him those ten minutes were very long.
  • Ten minutes afterwards, General Morcerf was seen on the steps in a black coat with a military collar, black pantaloons, and black gloves.
  • The horses bounded beneath the whip; and in five minutes they stopped before the count’s door.
  • The translation of this new question occupied another five minutes.
  • Ten minutes after he raised his head; his resolution was made.
  • At twenty minutes of twelve, Madame Danglars, tired of waiting, returned home.
  • Twenty minutes, twenty tedious minutes, passed thus, then ten more, and at last the clock struck the half-hour.
  • Twenty minutes, twenty tedious minutes, passed thus, then ten more, and at last the clock struck the half-hour.
  • But in less than five minutes the staircase groaned beneath an extraordinary weight.
  • Five minutes after the door had been closed on Morrel’s entrance, it was again opened for the count.
  • And he calmly waited until the twenty minutes had elapsed after Madame Danglars’ departure before he left the house.
  • The clerk continued to write for the next five minutes; the man preserved profound silence, and remained perfectly motionless.
  • At the expiration of ten minutes the clerk returned with a beaming countenance.
  • A few minutes afterwards a flash of light, which was extinguished instantly, was seen on the land, and the sound of firearms reached the yacht.
  • Ten minutes afterwards, the sails were furled, and they cast anchor about a hundred fathoms from the little harbor.
  • Five minutes after the door-keeper again appeared; all eyes were fixed on the door, and I," said Beauchamp, "shared the general expectation and anxiety.
  • He had sent away his carriage with orders for it to fetch him at two o’clock; fortunately the Palazzo Bracciano, which is on one side in the Corso, and on the other in the Square of the Holy Apostles, is hardly ten minutes’ walk from the Hotel de Londres.
  • Five minutes afterwards the piano resounded to the touch of Mademoiselle d’Armilly’s fingers, and Mademoiselle Danglars was singing Brabantio’s malediction on Desdemona.
  • Five minutes elapsed, during which Franz saw the shepherd going along a narrow path that led over the irregular and broken surface of the Campagna; and finally he disappeared in the midst of the tall red herbage, which seemed like the bristling mane of an enormous lion.
  • This lasted several minutes, until the frightful overturn of reason was accomplished; then uttering a loud cry followed by a burst of laughter, he rushed down the stairs.
  • "Try again," whispered the count, who depended on the secret spring, which was unknown to the picklock, clever as he might be—"try again, you have a few minutes’ work there."
  • When you arrived, Madame de Saint-Meran had already been panting for breath some minutes; she then had a fit, which I took to be simply a nervous attack, and it was only when I saw her raise herself in the bed, and her limbs and neck appear stiffened, that I became really alarmed.
  • She would, indeed, have found it impossible to repeat what had been said the last few minutes, when suddenly Madame Danglars’ hand, pressed on her arm, aroused her from her lethargy.
  • Ten minutes afterwards the surgeon and the procureur arrived, the one accompanied by the porter, the other by Ali, and were received by the Abbe Busoni, who was praying by the side of the corpse.
  • No doubt his ideas were arranged in a few minutes, for he began reading the letter which caused so much uneasiness in the heart of the baroness, and which ran as follows:— "Madame and most faithful wife."
  • In this room, at about ten o’clock in the morning, the banker himself had been walking to and fro for some minutes thoughtfully and in evident uneasiness, watching both doors, and listening to every sound.
  • The sentinel who was relieved at six o’clock in the morning, remembered perfectly that just as he was taking his post a few minutes past four a young man arrived on horseback, with a little boy before him.
  • Every minute she had expected that it would vanish and give place to another vision; but the man, instead of dissolving like a shadow, again approached her, and said in an agitated voice, "Now you may drink."
  • Dantes reflected, as he worked, on the shout of joy which, with a single word, he could evoke from all these men, if he gave utterance to the one unchanging thought that pervaded his heart; but, far from disclosing this precious secret, he almost feared that he had already said too much, and by his restlessness and continual questions, his minute observations and evident pre-occupation, aroused suspicions.
  • "I tell you it is too late; early this morning the telegraph was employed, and at this very minute"— "Sir," said the valet de chambre, entering the room, "a dragoon has brought this despatch from the minister of the interior."
  • He had not been more than ten minutes in the drawing-room before he drew Danglars aside into the recess of a bow-window, and, after an ingenious preamble, related to him all his anxieties and cares since his noble father’s departure.
  • Franz, who had mutely interrogated the countess, and received from her a gracious smile in token that he would be welcome, sought not to retard the gratification of Albert’s eager impatience, but began at once the tour of the house, closely followed by Albert, who availed himself of the few minutes required to reach the opposite side of the theatre to settle the height and smoothness of his collar, and to arrange the lappets of his coat.
  • After walking for about ten minutes, during which Danglars did not exchange a single word with his guide, he found himself between a hillock and a clump of high weeds; three men, standing silent, formed a triangle, of which he was the centre.
  • Twenty minutes afterwards a carriage stopped at the house, a lady alighted in a black or dark blue dress, and always thickly veiled; she passed like a shadow through the lodge, and ran up-stairs without a sound escaping under the touch of her light foot.
  • Upon issuing forth from his subterranean retreat at the expiration of five minutes, he found the abbe seated upon a wooden stool, leaning his elbow on a table, while Margotin, whose animosity seemed appeased by the unusual command of the traveller for refreshments, had crept up to him, and had established himself very comfortably between his knees, his long, skinny neck resting on his lap, while his dim eye was fixed earnestly on the traveller’s face.
  • From twelve to two o’clock Danglars had remained in his study, unsealing his dispatches, and becoming more and more sad every minute, heaping figure upon figure, and receiving, among other visits, one from Major Cavalcanti, who, as stiff and exact as ever, presented himself precisely at the hour named the night before, to terminate his business with the banker.
  • "Still it belongs to government, and I ought not to waste it; but, having received the signal that I might rest for an hour" (here he glanced at the sun-dial, for there was everything in the enclosure of Montlhery, even a sun-dial), "and having ten minutes before me, and my strawberries being ripe, when a day longer—by-the-by, sir, do you think dormice eat them?"
  • Meanwhile the count had arrived at his house; it had taken him six minutes to perform the distance, but these six minutes were sufficient to induce twenty young men who knew the price of the equipage they had been unable to purchase themselves, to put their horses in a gallop in order to see the rich foreigner who could afford to give 20,000 francs apiece for his horses.
  • Meanwhile the count had arrived at his house; it had taken him six minutes to perform the distance, but these six minutes were sufficient to induce twenty young men who knew the price of the equipage they had been unable to purchase themselves, to put their horses in a gallop in order to see the rich foreigner who could afford to give 20,000 francs apiece for his horses.
  • The lady always left first, and as soon as she had stepped into her carriage, it drove away, sometimes towards the right hand, sometimes to the left; then about twenty minutes afterwards the gentleman would also leave, buried in his cravat or concealed by his handkerchief.
  • In a few minutes, through all the doors, down all the staircases, by every exit, every one hastened to retire, or rather to fly; for it was a situation where the ordinary condolences,—which even the best friends are so eager to offer in great catastrophes,—were seen to be utterly futile.
  • Some few minutes had elapsed, and the stranger began to show manifest signs of impatience, when a slight noise was heard outside the aperture in the roof, and almost immediately a dark shadow seemed to obstruct the flood of light that had entered it, and the figure of a man was clearly seen gazing with eager scrutiny on the immense space beneath him; then, as his eye caught sight of him in the mantle, he grasped a floating mass of thickly matted boughs, and glided down by their help to…
  • I wrote to Franz—and were he here he would confirm every word—I wrote then to Franz that if he did not come with the four thousand crowns before six, at ten minutes past I should have gone to join the blessed saints and glorious martyrs in whose company I had the honor of being; and Signor Luigi Vampa, such was the name of the chief of these bandits, would have scrupulously kept his word.
  • Accustomed, however, as he was to the work, he had to repeat most of the letters of the alphabet and to find every word in the dictionary, so that it was ten minutes before the thought of the old man was translated by these words, "Fetch the glass of water and the decanter from Valentine’s room."
  • A few minutes after the scene of confusion produced in the salons of M. Danglars by the unexpected appearance of the brigade of soldiers, and by the disclosure which had followed, the mansion was deserted with as much rapidity as if a case of plague or of cholera morbus had broken out among the guests.
  • "I mean," said Albert, drawing near, and without apparently noticing Cavalcanti, who stood with his back towards the fireplace—"I mean to propose a meeting in some retired corner where no one will interrupt us for ten minutes; that will be sufficient—where two men having met, one of them will remain on the ground."
  • Danglars thought for ten minutes about his wife in Paris; another ten minutes about his daughter travelling with Mademoiselle d’Armilly; the same period was given to his creditors, and the manner in which he intended spending their money; and then, having no subject left for contemplation, he shut his eyes, and fell asleep.
  • Danglars thought for ten minutes about his wife in Paris; another ten minutes about his daughter travelling with Mademoiselle d’Armilly; the same period was given to his creditors, and the manner in which he intended spending their money; and then, having no subject left for contemplation, he shut his eyes, and fell asleep.
  • Ten minutes had elapsed since the nurse had left; Valentine, who for the last hour had been suffering from the fever which returned nightly, incapable of controlling her ideas, was forced to yield to the excitement which exhausted itself in producing and reproducing a succession and recurrence of the same fancies and images.
  • The exclamations, the insults addressed to Benedetto, who remained perfectly unconcerned, the energetic gestures, the movement of the gendarmes, the sneers of the scum of the crowd always sure to rise to the surface in case of any disturbance—all this lasted five minutes, before the door-keepers and magistrates were able to restore silence.
  • Ten minutes afterwards the baron entered his apartment, and Peppino stationed himself on the bench outside the door of the hotel, after having whispered something in the ear of one of the descendants of Marius and the Gracchi whom we noticed at the beginning of the chapter, who immediately ran down the road leading to the Capitol at his fullest speed.
  • Some of the apartments were closed within and without; the shutters were only opened to admit a minute’s air, showing the scared face of a footman, and immediately afterwards the window would be closed, like a gravestone falling on a sepulchre, and the neighbors would say to each other in a low voice, "Will there be another funeral to-day at the procureur’s house?"
  • Then, commencing a loud whistling noise, he rubbed them well all over their bodies for several minutes; then, undisturbed by the noisy crowd collected round the broken carriage, Ali quietly harnessed the pacified animals to the count’s chariot, took the reins in his hands, and mounted the box, when to the utter astonishment of those who had witnessed the ungovernable spirit and maddened speed of the same horses, he was actually compelled to apply his whip in no very gentle manner…
  • …offended," answered she, "but do you not see what a poor, helpless being I am, almost a stranger and an outcast in my father’s house, where even he is seldom seen; whose will has been thwarted, and spirits broken, from the age of ten years, beneath the iron rod so sternly held over me; oppressed, mortified, and persecuted, day by day, hour by hour, minute by minute, no person has cared for, even observed my sufferings, nor have I ever breathed one word on the subject save to yourself.
  • …offended," answered she, "but do you not see what a poor, helpless being I am, almost a stranger and an outcast in my father’s house, where even he is seldom seen; whose will has been thwarted, and spirits broken, from the age of ten years, beneath the iron rod so sternly held over me; oppressed, mortified, and persecuted, day by day, hour by hour, minute by minute, no person has cared for, even observed my sufferings, nor have I ever breathed one word on the subject save to yourself.
  • At the sixtieth minute of this hour, if the money is not forthcoming, he blows out the prisoner’s brains with a pistol-shot, or plants his dagger in his heart, and that settles the account."
  • "I am sure I am the first," cried Morrel; "I did it on purpose to have you a minute to myself, before every one came.
  • "Sir," said the gardener, glancing at the sun-dial, "the ten minutes are almost up; I must return to my post.
  • "I have, then, five minutes," said Monte Cristo to himself; "it is more time than I require.
  • "Sir," said she, "the language which I speak with my grandfather may be easily learnt, and I can teach you in a few minutes, to understand it almost as well as I can myself.
  • It must be a very irksome office to be the father of a grown-up daughter; it seems to make one feverish, and to raise one’s pulse to ninety beats a minute until the deed is done."
  • After living forty years with the marquis"— "It is not grief, my dear Villefort," said the doctor; "grief may kill, although it rarely does, and never in a day, never in an hour, never in ten minutes."
  • "Can you be a coward?" continued Villefort, with increasing excitement, "you, who could count, one by one, the minutes of four death agonies?
  • "Oh, well, then," said Monte Cristo, "I am not particular about these five notes, pay me in a different form; I wished, from curiosity, to take these, that I might be able to say that without any advice or preparation the house of Danglars had paid me five millions without a minute’s delay; it would have been remarkable.

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading