To better see all uses of the word
please enable javascript.

Used In
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • This, however, was a profound secret, not to be breathed beyond their own circle.
  • Something occurred, however, to give her a different duty.

  • Show more
  • However, we may as well go and sit with them a little while, and when we have that over, we can enjoy our walk.
  • She wished, however to see the Crofts, and was glad to be within when the visit was returned.
  • She found, however, that it was one to which she must inure herself.
  • Soon, however, she began to reason with herself, and try to be feeling less.
  • It would be but a new creation, however, and I never think much of your new creations.
  • After a short struggle, however, Charles Hayter seemed to quit the field.
  • But these measures, however good in themselves, were insufficient for the real extent of the evil, the whole of which Sir Walter found himself obliged to confess to her soon afterwards.
  • However, at any rate, as I have a great deal more at stake on this point than anybody else can have, I think it rather unnecessary in you to be advising me.

  • Show more again
  • Her husband, however, would not agree with her here; for besides having a regard for his cousin, Charles Hayter was an eldest son, and he saw things as an eldest son himself.
  • Her manners were open, easy, and decided, like one who had no distrust of herself, and no doubts of what to do; without any approach to coarseness, however, or any want of good humour.
  • She could not, however, reach such a degree of certainty, as not to be anxious to hear whether anything had been said on the subject at the other house, where the Crofts had previously been calling.
  • They were gone, she hoped, to be happy, however oddly constructed such happiness might seem; as for herself, she was left with as many sensations of comfort, as were, perhaps, ever likely to be hers.
  • She was assisted, however, by that perfect indifference and apparent unconsciousness, among the only three of her own friends in the secret of the past, which seemed almost to deny any recollection of it.
  • Before they were beyond her hearing, however, Louisa spoke again.
  • I had known you by character, however, long before.
  • The conclusion of her visit, however, was diversified in a way which she had not at all imagined.
  • He ventured among them again, however, though his spirits certainly did not seem fit for the mirth of the party in general.
  • The hardness of the pavement for her feet, made him less willing upon the present occasion; he did it, however.
  • That Louisa must remain where she was, however distressing to her friends to be involving the Harvilles in such trouble, did not admit a doubt.
  • She, however, was soon persuaded to think differently.
  • When the plan was made known to Mary, however, there was an end of all peace in it.
  • It was all quite natural, however.
  • My wife should have the credit of them, however.
  • Anne’s good-will, however, was not to be lessened by what she heard.
  • Captain Benwick came not, however.
  • A degree of unexpected cordiality, however, in the welcome she received, did her good.
  • He did not mean to complain, however.
  • He was not allowed to escape, however.
  • His enquiries, however, produced at length an account of the scene she had been engaged in there, soon after his leaving the place.
  • Anne presumed, however, still to smile about it, and at last to mention "Elizabeth."
  • She had weathered it, however, and could truly say that it had done her good.
  • I mean to make my profit of Mrs Wallis, however.
  • I should have visited Admiral Croft, however, at any rate.
  • The holidays, however, are over at last: I believe no children ever had such long ones.
  • Mrs Harville says her husband feels a good deal on his poor sister’s account; but, however, Louisa is a great favourite with both.
  • She did not mean, however, to derive much more from it to gratify her vanity, than Mary might have allowed.
  • When he did perceive and acknowledge her, however, it was done with all his usual frankness and good humour.
  • But here comes a friend, Captain Brigden; I shall only say, ’How d’ye do?’ as we pass, however.
  • Captain Wentworth, however, came from his window, apparently not ill-disposed for conversation; but Charles Hayter soon put an end to his attempts by seating himself near the table, and taking up the newspaper; and Captain Wentworth returned to his window.
  • Sir Walter, however, would choose his own means, and at last wrote a very fine letter of ample explanation, regret, and entreaty, to his right honourable cousin.
  • Still, however, she had the sensation of there being something more than immediately appeared, in Mr Elliot’s wishing, after an interval of so many years, to be well received by them.
  • At the same time, however, it was a secret gratification to herself to have seen her cousin, and to know that the future owner of Kellynch was undoubtedly a gentleman, and had an air of good sense.
  • In another moment, however, she found herself in the state of being released from him; some one was taking him from her, though he had bent down her head so much, that his little sturdy hands were unfastened from around her neck, and he was resolutely borne away, before she knew that Captain Wentworth had done it.
  • She had, however, one very intimate friend, a sensible, deserving woman, who had been brought, by strong attachment to herself, to settle close by her, in the village of Kellynch; and on her kindness and advice, Lady Elliot mainly relied for the best help and maintenance of the good principles and instruction which she had been anxiously giving her daughters.
  • We are all very well pleased, however, for though it is not equal to her marrying Captain Wentworth, it is infinitely better than Charles Hayter; and Mr Musgrove has written his consent, and Captain Benwick is expected to-day.
  • This had been a proof of life, however, of service to her sister; and Henrietta, though perfectly incapable of being in the same room with Louisa, was kept, by the agitation of hope and fear, from a return of her own insensibility.
  • Still, however, she had enough to feel!
  • After a short interval, however, he came towards her, and spoke again.
  • However, I have determined; I think I am right; I think you ought to be made acquainted with Mr Elliot’s real character.
  • If he does, however, they will leave me in peace, which may be a decent equivalent for the reversion.
  • "Quite delightful!" cried Mrs Clay, not daring, however, to turn her eyes towards Anne.
  • However, I do not mean to say they have not a right to it.
  • Their preparations, however, were stopped short.
  • Granting your assertion that the world does all this so soon for men (which, however, I do not think I shall grant), it does not apply to Benwick.
  • It could not be very lasting, however.
  • Do not mistake me, however.
  • This however was what Lady Russell had now to do.
  • To those, however, he was very well disposed to attach himself.
  • She had only time, however, to move closer to the table where he had been writing, when footsteps were heard returning; the door opened, it was himself.
  • He did not come however.
  • We are not asked to dine with them, however, till the day after, Mrs Musgrove is so afraid of her being fatigued by the journey, which is not very likely, considering the care that will be taken of her; and it would be much more convenient to me to dine there to-morrow.
  • Chapter 4 He was not Mr Wentworth, the former curate of Monkford, however suspicious appearances may be, but a Captain Frederick Wentworth, his brother, who being made commander in consequence of the action off St Domingo, and not immediately employed, had come into Somersetshire, in the summer of 1806; and having no parent living, found a home for half a year at Monkford.
  • However it might end, he was without any question their pleasantest acquaintance in Bath: she saw nobody equal to him; and it was a great indulgence now and then to talk to him about Lyme, which he seemed to have as lively a wish to see again, and to see more of, as herself.
  • Her distress returned, however, on perceiving smiles and intelligent glances pass between two or three of the lady visitors, as if they believed themselves quite in the secret.
  • It succeeded, however; and though Sir Walter must ever look with an evil eye on anyone intending to inhabit that house, and think them infinitely too well off in being permitted to rent it on the highest terms, he was talked into allowing Mr Shepherd to proceed in the treaty, and authorising him to wait on Admiral Croft, who still remained at Taunton, and fix a day for the house being seen.
  • However, when I found how excessively he was regretting that he should miss my father this morning, I gave way immediately, for I would never really omit an opportunity of bring him and Sir Walter together.
  • She was sent back, however, in a moment by the entrance of Captain Wentworth himself, among a party of gentlemen and ladies, evidently his acquaintance, and whom he must have joined a little below Milsom Street.
  • She could not keep her appointment punctually, however; the weather was unfavourable, and she had grieved over the rain on her friends’ account, and felt it very much on her own, before she was able to attempt the walk.
  • She persisted in a very determined, though very silent disinclination for Bath; caught the first dim view of the extensive buildings, smoking in rain, without any wish of seeing them better; felt their progress through the streets to be, however disagreeable, yet too rapid; for who would be glad to see her when she arrived?
  • Mrs Harville, a degree less polished than her husband, seemed, however, to have the same good feelings; and nothing could be more pleasant than their desire of considering the whole party as friends of their own, because the friends of Captain Wentworth, or more kindly hospitable than their entreaties for their all promising to dine with them.
  • …Admiral Croft was a native of Somersetshire, who having acquired a very handsome fortune, was wishing to settle in his own country, and had come down to Taunton in order to look at some advertised places in that immediate neighbourhood, which, however, had not suited him; that accidentally hearing—(it was just as he had foretold, Mr Shepherd observed, Sir Walter’s concerns could not be kept a secret,)—accidentally hearing of the possibility of Kellynch Hall being to let, and…
  • It was growing quite dusk, however, before they were in the neighbourhood of Uppercross, and there had been total silence among them for some time, Henrietta leaning back in the corner, with a shawl over her face, giving the hope of her having cried herself to sleep; when, as they were going up their last hill, Anne found herself all at once addressed by Captain Wentworth.
  • She has abilities, however, as well as affections; and it is now a doubtful point whether his cunning, or hers, may finally carry the day; whether, after preventing her from being the wife of Sir Walter, he may not be wheedled and caressed at last into making her the wife of Sir William.
  • …sister; and Lady Russell had lamented her refusal; for Charles Musgrove was the eldest son of a man, whose landed property and general importance were second in that country, only to Sir Walter’s, and of good character and appearance; and however Lady Russell might have asked yet for something more, while Anne was nineteen, she would have rejoiced to see her at twenty-two so respectably removed from the partialities and injustice of her father’s house, and settled so permanently near…
  • …like to go with them; and when Mary immediately replied, with some jealousy at not being supposed a good walker, "Oh, yes, I should like to join you very much, I am very fond of a long walk;" Anne felt persuaded, by the looks of the two girls, that it was precisely what they did not wish, and admired again the sort of necessity which the family habits seemed to produce, of everything being to be communicated, and everything being to be done together, however undesired and inconvenient.
  • Winthrop, however, or its environs—for young men are, sometimes to be met with, strolling about near home—was their destination; and after another half mile of gradual ascent through large enclosures, where the ploughs at work, and the fresh made path spoke the farmer counteracting the sweets of poetical despondence, and meaning to have spring again, they gained the summit of the most considerable hill, which parted Uppercross and Winthrop, and soon commanded a full view of the latter,…
  • Anne was amused by Henrietta’s manner of being grateful, and amused also that the course of events and the new interests of Henrietta’s views should have placed her friend at all in favour with any of the Musgrove family; she had only time, however, for a general answer, and a wish that such another woman were at Uppercross, before all subjects suddenly ceased, on seeing Louisa and Captain Wentworth coming towards them.
  • Charles and Mary still talked on in the same style; he, half serious and half jesting, maintaining the scheme for the play, and she, invariably serious, most warmly opposing it, and not omitting to make it known that, however determined to go to Camden Place herself, she should not think herself very well used, if they went to the play without her.
  • She looked at her however, from time to time, anxiously; and when the moment approached which must point him out, though not daring to look again (for her own countenance she knew was unfit to be seen), she was yet perfectly conscious of Lady Russell’s eyes being turned exactly in the direction for him—of her being, in short, intently observing him.
  • She could have said more on the subject; for she had in fact so high an opinion of the Crofts, and considered her father so very fortunate in his tenants, felt the parish to be so sure of a good example, and the poor of the best attention and relief, that however sorry and ashamed for the necessity of the removal, she could not but in conscience feel that they were gone who deserved not to stay, and that Kellynch Hall had passed into better hands than its owners’.
  • Either from the consciousness, however, that his friend had recovered, or from other consciousness, he went no farther; and Anne who, in spite of the agitated voice in which the latter part had been uttered, and in spite of all the various noises of the room, the almost ceaseless slam of the door, and ceaseless buzz of persons walking through, had distinguished every word, was struck, gratified, confused, and beginning to breathe very quick, and feel an hundred things in a moment.
  • "No," admitted Charles, "I do not know that he ever does, in a general way; but however, it is a very clear thing that he admires you exceedingly.
  • It was but a passing emotion however with Mrs Smith; she shook it off, and soon added in a different tone— "I do not suppose the situation my friend Mrs Rooke is in at present, will furnish much either to interest or edify me.
  • She exclaimed, however, with a very tolerable imitation of nature:— "Oh! dear! very true.
  • After clearing his throat, however, he proceeded thus— "I confess that I do think there is a disparity, too great a disparity, and in a point no less essential than mind.
  • "It was a frightful hour," said he, "a frightful day!" and he passed his hand across his eyes, as if the remembrance were still too painful, but in a moment, half smiling again, added, "The day has produced some effects however; has had some consequences which must be considered as the very reverse of frightful.
  • After talking, however, of the weather, and Bath, and the concert, their conversation began to flag, and so little was said at last, that she was expecting him to go every moment, but he did not; he seemed in no hurry to leave her; and presently with renewed spirit, with a little smile, a little glow, he said— "I have hardly seen you since our day at Lyme.

  • There are no more uses of "however" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: However, complications may... Define
despite that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include in spite of that, nevertheless, nonetheless, and on the other hand.)
as in: However much she tried... Define
to whatever degree (regardless of how much)
as in: However you do it, get it done! Define
in whatever way
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading