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Oliver Twist
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Oliver Twist
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unspecified meaning
  • ’I suppose they are those heavy ones, sir,’ said Oliver, pointing to some large quartos, with a good deal of gilding about the binding.
  • ’If we was to bind him to any other trade to-morrow, he’d run away simultaneous, your worship,’ replied Bumble.

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  • The board, in imitation of so wise and salutary an example, took counsel together on the expediency of shipping off Oliver Twist, in some small trading vessel bound to a good unhealthy port.
  • Here, a bed was prepared, without loss of time, in which Mr. Brownlow saw his young charge carefully and comfortably deposited; and here, he was tended with a kindness and solicitude that knew no bounds.
  • At such time, a mortal knows just enough of what his mind is doing, to form some glimmering conception of its mighty powers, its bounding from earth and spurning time and space, when freed from the restraint of its corporeal associate.
  • ’Change it!’ exclaimed the Jew, exasperated beyond all bounds by his companion’s unexpected obstinacy, and the vexation of the night, ’I will change it!
  • Rose had been in high spirits, too, and they had walked on, in merry conversation, until they had far exceeded their ordinary bounds.
  • And me bound, too, to a born devil that only wants the will, and has the power to, to—’
  • His wounded arm, bound and splintered up, was crossed upon his breast; his head reclined upon the other arm, which was half hidden by his long hair, as it streamed over the pillow.
  • Covered ways and yards, which here and there diverged from the main street, disclosed little knots of houses, where drunken men and women were positively wallowing in filth; and from several of the door-ways, great ill-looking fellows were cautiously emerging, bound, to all appearance, on no very well-disposed or harmless errands.

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  • While he was thus engaged, and the two men sat by in silence with their eyes fixed upon the floor, a pattering noise was heard upon the stairs, and Sikes’s dog bounded into the room.
  • As they approached the town, and at length drove through its narrow streets, it became matter of no small difficulty to restrain the boy within reasonable bounds.
  • CHAPTER XLVIII THE FLIGHT OF SIKES Of all bad deeds that, under cover of the darkness, had been committed within wide London’s bounds since night hung over it, that was the worst.
  • ’Then,’ said the doctor impetuously, ’I put it to you again, whether you think it reasonable that this promise to the girl should be considered binding; a promise made with the best and kindest intentions, but really—’
  • He needn’t haven taken the trouble to shrink from Mr. Bumble’s glance, however; for that functionary, on whom the prediction of the gentleman in the white waistcoat had made a very strong impression, thought that now the undertaker had got Oliver upon trial the subject was better avoided, until such time as he should be firmly bound for seven years, and all danger of his being returned upon the hands of the parish should be thus effectually and legally overcome.
  • Sikes clenched his teeth; took one look around; threw over the prostrate form of Oliver, the cape in which he had been hurriedly muffled; ran along the front of the hedge, as if to distract the attention of those behind, from the spot where the boy lay; paused, for a second, before another hedge which met it at right angles; and whirling his pistol high into the air, cleared it at a bound, and was gone.
  • …consigned to the care and custody of Mr. William Sikes; and further, that the said Sikes should deal with him as he thought fit; and should not be held responsible by the Jew for any mischance or evil that might be necessary to visit him: it being understood that, to render the compact in this respect binding, any representations made by Mr. Sikes on his return should be required to be confirmed and corroborated, in all important particulars, by the testimony of flash Toby Crackit.
  • ’It is because I was your father’s oldest friend, young man,’ returned Mr. Brownlow; ’it is because the hopes and wishes of young and happy years were bound up with him, and that fair creature of his blood and kindred who rejoined her God in youth, and left me here a solitary, lonely man: it is because he knelt with me beside his only sisters’ death-bed when he was yet a boy, on the morning that would—but Heaven willed otherwise—have made her my young wife; it is because my seared…

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: south-bound lanes Define
travelling in a particular direction or to a specific location
as in: She's bound to succeed. Define
almost certain to; or determined to
as in: bound together Define
held together (connected or united) or wrapped (see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
as in: I can't/must. I'm bound by... Define
tied up, prevented, or required
as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
as in: It put me in a bind. Define
a difficult situation
as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
as in: The deer bound across the trail. Define
to leap or jump
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