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Northanger Abbey
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Northanger Abbey
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unspecified meaning
  • As for Mr. Allen, he repaired directly to the card-room, and left them to enjoy a mob by themselves.
  • Very true, my dear; and if we knew anybody we would join them directly.

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  • "Well, Miss Morland," said he, directly, "I hope you have had an agreeable ball."
  • If you are I will begin directly.
  • I will read you their names directly; here they are, in my pocketbook.
  • He asked fifty guineas; I closed with him directly, threw down the money, and the carriage was mine.
  • Her own feelings entirely engrossed her; her wretchedness was most acute on finding herself obliged to go directly home.
  • We shall drive directly to Clifton and dine there; and, as soon as dinner is over, if there is time for it, go on to Kingsweston.
  • Did upon my soul; knew him again directly, and he seemed to have got some very pretty cattle too.
  • He was a very handsome man, of a commanding aspect, past the bloom, but not past the vigour of life; and with his eye still directed towards her, she saw him presently address Mr. Tilney in a familiar whisper.

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  • From such a moralizing strain as this, she was suddenly roused by a touch on the shoulder, and turning round, perceived Mrs. Hughes directly behind her, attended by Miss Tilney and a gentleman.
  • I must run after Miss Tilney directly and set her right.
  • Mr. Allen caught at it directly.
  • "I will write home directly," said she, "and if they do not object, as I dare say they will not—"
  • When Catherine knew this, her resolution was directly made.
  • Pray advise him for his own sake, and for everybody’s sake, to leave Bath directly.
  • His greatcoat, instead of being brought for him to put on directly, was spread out in the curricle in which he was to accompany his son.
  • I will look into it—cost me what it may, I will look into it—and directly too—by daylight.
  • Every other look upon an average was directed towards the opposite box; and, for the space of two entire scenes, did she thus watch Henry Tilney, without being once able to catch his eye.
  • John Thorpe, who in the meantime had been giving orders about the horses, soon joined them, and from him she directly received the amends which were her due; for while he slightly and carelessly touched the hand of Isabella, on her he bestowed a whole scrape and half a short bow.
  • Catherine then ran directly upstairs, and watched Miss Thorpe’s progress down the street from the drawing-room window; admired the graceful spirit of her walk, the fashionable air of her figure and dress; and felt grateful, as well she might, for the chance which had procured her such a friend.
  • Catherine, delighted at so happy an escape, spoke her pleasure aloud with grateful surprise; and her companion immediately made the matter perfectly simple by assuring her that it was entirely owing to the peculiarly judicious manner in which he had then held the reins, and the singular discernment and dexterity with which he had directed his whip.
  • Pray write to me soon, and direct to my own home.
  • And the anxiousness of her spirits directed her eyes towards his figure so repeatedly, as to catch Miss Tilney’s notice.
  • Isabella promised so faithfully to write directly.
  • They went to breakfast directly; but Catherine could hardly eat anything.
  • The last time we met was in Bath Street, and I turned directly into a shop that he might not speak to me; I would not even look at him.
  • And it was directly settled that, till she had, her leaving them was not even to be thought of.
  • Catherine took up her work directly, saying, in a dejected voice, that "her head did not run upon Bath—much."
  • To Milsom Street she was directed, and having made herself perfect in the number, hastened away with eager steps and a beating heart to pay her visit, explain her conduct, and be forgiven; tripping lightly through the church-yard, and resolutely turning away her eyes, that she might not be obliged to see her beloved Isabella and her dear family, who, she had reason to believe, were in a shop hard by.
  • Because I am to hope for the satisfaction of seeing you at Woodston on Wednesday, which bad weather, or twenty other causes, may prevent, I must go away directly, two days before I intended it.
  • The general’s early walk, ill-timed as it was in every other view, was favourable here; and when she knew him to be out of the house, she directly proposed to Miss Tilney the accomplishment of her promise.
  • Miss Tilney gently hinted her fear of being late; and in half a minute they ran downstairs together, in an alarm not wholly unfounded, for General Tilney was pacing the drawing-room, his watch in his hand, and having, on the very instant of their entering, pulled the bell with violence, ordered "Dinner to be on table directly!"
  • Catherine had never heard Mrs. Tilney mentioned in the family before, and the interest excited by this tender remembrance showed itself directly in her altered countenance, and in the attentive pause with which she waited for something more.
  • She had just settled this point when the end of the path brought them directly upon the general; and in spite of all her virtuous indignation, she found herself again obliged to walk with him, listen to him, and even to smile when he smiled.
  • …the winner; of shooting parties, in which he had killed more birds (though without having one good shot) than all his companions together; and described to her some famous day’s sport, with the fox-hounds, in which his foresight and skill in directing the dogs had repaired the mistakes of the most experienced huntsman, and in which the boldness of his riding, though it had never endangered his own life for a moment, had been constantly leading others into difficulties, which he calmly…
  • Such a compliment recalled all Catherine’s consciousness, and silenced her directly; and, though pointedly applied to by the general for her choice of the prevailing colour of the paper and hangings, nothing like an opinion on the subject could be drawn from her.
  • Impatient to get rid of those hateful evidences of her folly, those detestable papers then scattered over the bed, she rose directly, and folding them up as nearly as possible in the same shape as before, returned them to the same spot within the cabinet, with a very hearty wish that no untoward accident might ever bring them forward again, to disgrace her even with herself.
  • …being so very early engaged as a partner; and the consequence was that, when the two Morlands, after sitting an hour with the Thorpes, set off to walk together to Mr. Allen’s, and James, as the door was closed on them, said, "Well, Catherine, how do you like my friend Thorpe?" instead of answering, as she probably would have done, had there been no friendship and no flattery in the case, "I do not like him at all," she directly replied, "I like him very much; he seems very agreeable."
  • It was some time however before she could unfasten the door, the same difficulty occurring in the management of this inner lock as of the outer; but at length it did open; and not vain, as hitherto, was her search; her quick eyes directly fell on a roll of paper pushed back into the further part of the cavity, apparently for concealment, and her feelings at that moment were indescribable.
  • He felt himself bound as much in honour as in affection to Miss Morland, and believing that heart to be his own which he had been directed to gain, no unworthy retraction of a tacit consent, no reversing decree of unjustifiable anger, could shake his fidelity, or influence the resolutions it prompted.
  • In the joyfulness of family love everything for a short time was subdued, and the pleasure of seeing her, leaving them at first little leisure for calm curiosity, they were all seated round the tea-table, which Mrs. Morland had hurried for the comfort of the poor traveller, whose pale and jaded looks soon caught her notice, before any inquiry so direct as to demand a positive answer was addressed to her.
  • Such was the information of the first five minutes; the second unfolded thus much in detail—that they had driven directly to the York Hotel, ate some soup, and bespoke an early dinner, walked down to the pump-room, tasted the water, and laid out some shillings in purses and spars; thence adjoined to eat ice at a pastry-cook’s, and hurrying back to the hotel, swallowed their dinner in haste, to prevent being in the dark; and then had a delightful drive back, only the moon was not up,…
  • Miss Tilney drew back directly, and the heavy doors were closed upon the mortified Catherine, who, having seen, in a momentary glance beyond them, a narrower passage, more numerous openings, and symptoms of a winding staircase, believed herself at last within the reach of something worth her notice; and felt, as she unwillingly paced back the gallery, that she would rather be allowed to examine that end of the house than see all the finery of all the rest.
  • Direct to me at Lord Longtown’s, and, I must ask it, under cover to Alice."
  • Eleanor made no answer; and Catherine’s thoughts recurring to something more directly interesting, she added, thinking aloud, "Monday—so soon as Monday; and you all go.

  • There are no more uses of "direct" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: walked directly to work Define
proceeding without interruption in the straightest or quickest possible manner
as in: directly above; or buy direct from Define
straight (exactly where stated; or without anything in between)
as in: was direct in my instructions Define
straightforward (clear and explicit -- perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
as in: directed her question to Define
aim or focus
as in: directed the jury to... Define
give instructions or commands (directions that must be followed)
as in: directed the movie Define
supervise or administer (often while giving directions or orders)
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