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wretched
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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wretched
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Wretched—wretched that I am!
  • Wretched—wretched that I am!
  • By the light of the wretched and wavering lamp, of which we have spoken, Dantes saw the old man, pale, but yet erect, clinging to the bedstead.
  • Then boats filled with armed soldiers will pursue the wretched fugitive.
  • Then his eyes lighted up with hatred as he thought of the three men who had caused him so long and wretched a captivity.
  • Besides, it were better to die than to continue to lead this low and wretched life.
  • He died a more wretched, hopeless, heart-broken prisoner than the felons who pay the penalty of their crimes at the galleys of Toulon.
  • I only, as you see, have remained poor, wretched, and forgotten.
  • Danglars comprehended the full extent of the wretched fate that overwhelmed Dantes; and, when Napoleon returned to France, he, after the manner of mediocre minds, termed the coincidence, "a decree of Providence."
  • ’—’Yes,’ chimed in La Carconte, ’they will have a wretched night of it.’
  • The wretched man was sentenced to the galleys for life, and I was immediately set at liberty.
  • "My wretched curiosity has brought all this about," pursued the lady.
  • And the wretched family departed, leaving a cloud of sadness hanging over the rest of the evening.
  • It was, indeed, Maximilian Morrel, who had passed a wretched existence since the previous day.
  • Franz now listened to it for the third time; yet its notes, so tenderly expressive and fearfully grand as the wretched husband and wife give vent to their different griefs and passions, thrilled through the soul of Franz with an effect equal to his first emotions upon hearing it.
  • "We were having a confidential conversation," returned Valentine; "she was owning to me her repugnance to the marriage with M. de Morcerf; and I, on the other hand, was confessing to her how wretched it made me to think of marrying M. d’Epinay."
  • One morning my father sent for us; my mother had been crying all the night, and was very wretched; we found the pasha calm, but paler than usual.
  • When the wretched man again opened his eyes, the count looked at him with a mournful expression of pity, and his lips moved as if in prayer.
  • Then, wretched creature, then you tempted God a third time.
  • Reflect, then, wretched man, and repent.
  • I am the most wretched of men.
  • "But it is the wretched"— "That man cannot injure me, Haidee," said Monte Cristo; "it was his son alone that there was cause to fear."
  • Four wretched fares, and twenty sous over, making in all seven francs, are all that I have earned, and I ought to take ten to the owner.
  • For the last month this wretched house had presented the gloomy appearance of a lazaretto infected with the plague.
  • Come and watch by the dead, and all the wretched family will be grateful to you.
  • "I am, indeed, most wretched," replied Mercedes.
  • "Woe," he cried, "to those who confined me in that wretched prison; and woe to those who forgot that I was there!"
  • What can be more wretched than the man who has lost all he loved and desired in the world?
  • I did hope (man is a poor wretched creature), I did hope.
  • Yes, as you said, you are indeed wretched and a miracle alone can cure you.
  • It is a wretched, damp, nay, even horrible spot, more especially when we consider the agonizing conferences which have taken place between those iron bars.
  • "I tell you that with that wretched sum," continued Andrea, "I could obtain a coat, and a room in which to receive the illustrious visitor I am daily expecting."
  • Yes; because instead of expecting two hundred wretched francs, you expect five or six thousand, perhaps ten, perhaps even twelve, for you take care not to let any one know the utmost.
  • An indescribable ray of joy illumined that wretched countenance like the last ray of the sun before it disappears behind the clouds which bear the aspect, not of a downy couch, but of a tomb.
  • Oh, the wretched hours I have endured—the torture to which I have submitted when I saw the deadly poison poured into your glass, and how I trembled lest you should drink it before I could find time to throw it away!
  • While he was thus agitated by gloomy uncertainties,—wretched waking dreams of grief,—the first rays of morning pierced his windows, and shone upon the pale blue paper on which he had just inscribed his justification of providence.
  • …would be compelled to own, were they here, that all true devotion was on our side, since we were content to follow the fortunes of a falling monarch, while they, on the contrary, made their fortune by worshipping the rising sun; yes, yes, they could not help admitting that the king, for whom we sacrificed rank, wealth, and station was truly our ’Louis the well-beloved,’ while their wretched usurper his been, and ever will be, to them their evil genius, their ’Napoleon the accursed.’
  • "Not at all; we have received with the information all the requisite proofs, and we are quite sure M. de Morcerf will not raise his voice against us; besides, it is rendering a service to one’s country to denounce these wretched criminals who are unworthy of the honor bestowed on them."
  • Now, by way of having a resting-place during his excursions, avoiding the wretched cookery—which has been trying its best to poison me during the last four months, while you have manfully resisted its effects for as many years,—and obtaining a bed on which it is possible to slumber, Monte Cristo has furnished for himself a temporary abode where you first found him; but, to prevent the possibility of the Tuscan government taking a fancy to his enchanted palace, and thereby depriving him…
  • "Yes," answered Monte Cristo "happily, yes, conscience does remain; and if it did not, how wretched we should be!
  • "And now, my dear friend," said Faria, "sole consolation of my wretched existence,—you whom heaven gave me somewhat late, but still gave me, a priceless gift, and for which I am most grateful,—at the moment of separating from you forever, I wish you all the happiness and all the prosperity you so well deserve.
  • "Come," said Caderousse, wiping his large knife on his apron, "if I did not like you, do you think I should endure the wretched life you lead me?
  • "Oh," replied the wretched woman, mournfully shaking her head, "the prosperity of which you speak, and which, from the bottom of my heart, I pray God in his mercy to grant him, I can never enjoy.

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  • The children were taken into protective custody due to their wretched living conditions.
  • The photograph showed poor people in a wretched village in East Africa.

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