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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO by Alexandre Dumas, Pere Chapter 1.
  • The name of Sinbad the Sailor, as may well be supposed, awakened in him a world of recollections, as had the name of the Count of Monte Cristo on the previous evening.
  • "Your excellencies are aware," responded the landlord, swelling with importance, "that the Count of Monte Cristo is living on the same floor with yourselves!"
  • As for the Count of Monte Cristo, he had never for an instant shown any appearance of having been moved.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo is unquestionably a man of first-rate breeding and knowledge of the world.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo is always an early riser; and I can answer for his having been up these two hours.
  • "Well," asked Franz, "what think you of the Count of Monte Cristo?"
  • The Count of Monte Cristo.
  • They were thus engaged when the Count of Monte Cristo entered.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo remained a quarter of an hour with them, conversing on all subjects with the greatest ease.
  • After dinner, the Count of Monte Cristo was announced.
  • The two friends sat down to table; but they could not refrain from remarking the difference between the Count of Monte Cristo’s table and that of Signor Pastrini.
  • "Now, my excellent Signor Pastrini," said Franz, addressing his landlord, "since we are both ready, do you think we may proceed at once to visit the Count of Monte Cristo?"
  • When, then, the Count of Monte Cristo, hearing of the dilemma in which you are placed, has sent to offer you seats in his carriage and two places at his windows in the Palazzo Rospoli.
  • "His excellency the Count of Monte Cristo had," he said, "given positive orders that the carriage was to remain at their lordships’ orders all day, and they could therefore dispose of it without fear of indiscretion."
  • The groom, in obedience to his orders, tapped at the window of the porter’s lodge, saying, "Pray, does not the Count of Monte Cristo live here?"
  • Well, this letter gives the Count of Monte Cristo unlimited credit on our house.
  • You are, then, doubtless, the Count of Monte Cristo, of whom Hermine has talked to me so much?
  • P.S.—Do pray contrive some means for me to meet the Count of Monte Cristo at your house.
  • Such was the man whose carriage had just now stopped before the Count of Monte Cristo’s door.
  • "My dear fellow," said Lucien, "here is the Count of Monte Cristo, who will say to you, as the Italians do,— " ’Danaro e santita, Meta della meta.’
  • Go to the Count of Monte Cristo, Avenue des Champs Elysees, on the 26th of May, at seven o’clock in the evening, and demand of him your father.
  • Was it not by chance the Count of Monte Cristo bought that house?
  • "But," replied Madame Danglars, "the Count of Monte Cristo can know nothing, or he would not seek our society as he does."
  • Will not the Count of Monte Cristo be here to-night?
  • You were going to ask me if the Count of Monte Cristo had arrived, or was expected.
  • He remembered the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • "No, not I," replied Franz, "but our neighbor, the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • No, his name is the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • "Yes," said Albert, "but this has nothing to do with the existence of the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • But the sound of the clock had not died away when Germain announced, "His excellency the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • We were speaking of a suitable habitation for the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • This portrait attracted the Count of Monte Cristo’s attention, for he made three rapid steps in the chamber, and stopped suddenly before it.
  • Albert summoned his servant, and ordered him to acquaint M. and Madame de Morcerf of the arrival of the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Some grand personage—a prince I believe they said—the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • "The Count of Monte Cristo, I believe?" said he.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo?
  • The Count of Monte Cristo offered his arm to Madame de Villefort.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Do you know the Count of Monte Cristo?
  • Do you think the Count of Monte Cristo had ever been in France before he made this visit to Paris?
  • The Count of Monte Cristo had just entered.
  • The next day must clear up every doubt; and unless his near neighbor and would-be friend, the Count of Monte Cristo, possessed the ring of Gyges, and by its power was able to render himself invisible, it was very certain he could not escape this time.
  • M. de Villefort kept the promise he had made to Madame Danglars, to endeavor to find out how the Count of Monte Cristo had discovered the history of the house at Auteuil.
  • It will be recollected that the new, or rather old, acquaintances of the Count of Monte Cristo, residing in the Rue Meslay, were no other than Maximilian, Julie, and Emmanuel.
  • "Ah, father," said Albert with a smile, "it is evident you do not know the Count of Monte Cristo; he despises all honors, and contents himself with those written on his passport."
  • In the house in the Rue du Helder, where Albert had invited the Count of Monte Cristo, everything was being prepared on the morning of the 21st of May to do honor to the occasion.
  • That same evening, upon reaching his abode in the Champs Elysees, the Count of Monte Cristo went over the whole building with the air of one long acquainted with each nook or corner.
  • I enclose a draft for 5,000 livres, payable on M. Ferrea, banker at Nice, and also a letter of introduction to the Count of Monte Cristo, whom I have directed to supply all your wants.
  • "Now, then," said Maximilian, leaning on the handle of his spade, "I would give a good deal to know how it comes about that the Count of Monte Cristo is acquainted with M. de Villefort."
  • In the meanwhile Franz was considering the singular shudder that had passed over the Count of Monte Cristo at the moment when he had been, in some sort, forced to give his hand to Albert.
  • "I have already had the pleasure of meeting this gentleman at Auteuil, at the house of the Count of Monte Cristo," replied Madame de Villefort, turning away with marked coldness of manner.
  • "Ma foi, spread that idea," replied the Count of Monte Cristo, putting his foot on the velvet-lined steps of his splendid carriage, "and that will be worth something to me among the ladies."
  • Cocles opened the gate, and Baptistin, springing from the box, inquired whether Monsieur and Madame Herbault and Monsieur Maximilian Morrel would see his excellency the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • If the Count of Monte Cristo had been for a long time familiar with the ways of Parisian society, he would have appreciated better the significance of the step which M. de Villefort had taken.
  • "Gentlemen," said the Count of Monte Cristo as he entered, "I pray you excuse me for suffering my visit to be anticipated; but I feared to disturb you by presenting myself earlier at your apartments; besides, you sent me word that you would come to me, and I have held myself at your disposal."
  • Franz hastened to inquire after the count, and to express regret that he had not returned in sufficient time; but Pastrini reassured him by saying that the Count of Monte Cristo had ordered a second carriage for himself, and that it had gone at four o’clock to fetch him from the Rospoli Palace.
  • M. and Madame de Villefort found on their return that the Count of Monte Cristo, who had come to visit them in their absence, had been ushered into the drawing-room, and was still awaiting them there.
  • Set out immediately for Paris, and demand of the Count of Monte Cristo, Avenue des Champs Elysees, No. 30, the son whom you had by the Marchesa Corsinari, and who was taken from you at five years of age.
  • "Father," said the young man, "I have the honor of presenting to you the Count of Monte Cristo, the generous friend whom I had the good fortune to meet in the critical situation of which I have told you."
  • How a Gardener May Get Rid of the Dormice that Eat His Peaches Not on the same night, as he had intended, but the next morning, the Count of Monte Cristo went out by the Barrier d’Enfer, taking the road to Orleans.
  • It was really the Count of Monte Cristo who had just arrived at Madame de Villefort’s for the purpose of returning the procureur’s visit, and at his name, as may be easily imagined, the whole house was in confusion.
  • He went down to the stables, not without some slight annoyance, when he remembered that the Count of Monte Cristo had laid his hands on a "turnout" which sent his bays down to second place in the opinion of connoisseurs.
  • Do not believe what Albert is telling you, countess; so far from the sensation excited in the Parisian circles by the appearance of the Count of Monte Cristo having abated, I take upon myself to declare that it is as strong as ever.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo entered the adjoining room, which Baptistin had designated as the drawing-room, and found there a young man, of graceful demeanor and elegant appearance, who had arrived in a cab about half an hour previously.
  • "A thousand thanks for your kindness, viscount," returned the Count of Monte Cristo "but I suppose that M. Bertuccio has suitably employed the four hours and a half I have given him, and that I shall find a carriage of some sort ready at the door."
  • Is it, then, that young man whom my friend the Count of Monte Cristo has received into his house, and who is going to marry Mademoiselle Danglars?
  • ’Madame,’ said the president, ’may reference be made to the Count of Monte Cristo, who is now, I believe, in Paris?
  • ’—’Sir,’ replied Haidee, ’the Count of Monte Cristo, my foster-father, has been in Normandy the last three days.’
  • But the Count of Monte Cristo surrounds me with every paternal care, and I am ignorant of nothing which passes in the world.
  • Beauchamp," interposed this strange man, "the Count of Monte Cristo bows to none but the Count of Monte Cristo himself.
  • The noiseless door again turned on its hinges, and the Count of Monte Cristo reappeared.
  • "I am seeking the Count of Monte Cristo" said the young man.
  • This affair, like all those in which the Count of Monte Cristo had interfered, caused a great sensation in Paris.
  • I do not see the Count of Monte Cristo here.
  • "Ah, now I think of it, the Count of Monte Cristo cannot appear in the hall," said Beauchamp.
  • "It is the face of the Count of Monte Cristo!" exclaimed the procureur, with a haggard expression.
  • Nearly at the same instant the door was opened and the Count of Monte Cristo appeared on the threshold.
  • You are mistaken—I am not the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • The slave of the Count of Monte Cristo!
  • "So you would rob the Count of Monte Cristo?" continued the false abbe.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo, the very same in whose house we are.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo told you to write to Yanina?
  • Beauchamp," interposed this strange man, "the Count of Monte Cristo bows to none but the Count of Monte Cristo himself.
  • "Stop, gentlemen," said Albert; "I have two words to say to the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • The Count of Monte Cristo acts dishonorably to M. de Morcerf, and is justified by his son!
  • The Count of Monte Cristo bowed to the five young men with a melancholy and dignified smile, and got into his carriage with Maximilian and Emmanuel.
  • You will say I apologized to the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • You call yourself in Paris the Count of Monte Cristo; in Italy, Sinbad the Sailor; in Malta, I forget what.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo turned dreadfully pale; his eye seemed to burn with a devouring fire.
  • "The Count of Monte Cristo!" she murmured.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo?
  • On the receipt of the Count of Monte Cristo?
  • "The Count of Monte Cristo!" said Danglars, more pale from terror than he had been just before from hunger and misery.
  • God gave that spectre the form of the Count of Monte Cristo when he at length issued from his tomb, enriched him with gold and diamonds, and led him to you!
  • Some days after this meeting, Albert de Morcerf visited the Count of Monte Cristo at his house in the Champs Elysees, which had already assumed that palace-like appearance which the count’s princely fortune enabled him to give even to his most temporary residences.
  • Lord Wilmore, having heard the door close after him, returned to his bedroom, where with one hand he pulled off his light hair, his red whiskers, his false jaw, and his wound, to resume the black hair, dark complexion, and pearly teeth of the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • Come—do you know of what the Count of Monte Cristo is capable? do you know that he holds terrestrial beings under his control? nay, that he can almost work a miracle?
  • In order that you may not doubt the kind intention of the writer of this letter, you will find enclosed an order for 2,400 francs, payable in Florence, at Signor Gozzi’s; also a letter of introduction to the Count of Monte Cristo, on whom I give you a draft of 48,000 francs.
  • "Sir," said he to Danglars, "understand that I do not take a final leave of you; I must ascertain if your insinuations are just, and am going now to inquire of the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • Then the porter raised some difficulties, but the Count of Monte Cristo produced a permit from the governor of Rome, allowing him to leave or enter the city at any hour of the day or night; the portcullis was therefore raised, the porter had a louis for his trouble, and they went on their way.
  • Such was the picturesque costume of the person who rang at the gate, and demanded if it was not at No. 30 in the Avenue des Champs-Elysees that the Count of Monte Cristo lived, and who, being answered by the porter in the affirmative, entered, closed the gate after him, and began to ascend the steps.
  • Villefort, astonished at this reply, which he by no means expected, started like a soldier who feels the blow levelled at him over the armor he wears, and a curl of his disdainful lip indicated that from that moment he noted in the tablets of his brain that the Count of Monte Cristo was by no means a highly bred gentleman.
  • "He is accused," said the commissary with his inflexible voice, "of having assassinated the man named Caderousse, his former companion in prison, at the moment he was making his escape from the house of the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • "Approach, gentlemen," said Albert; "I wish you not to lose one word of what I am about to have the honor of saying to the Count of Monte Cristo, for it must be repeated by you to all who will listen to it, strange as it may appear to you."
  • Know, then, what I thought I had already told you, that in participation in this world’s affairs, more especially in their moral aspects, the Count of Monte Cristo has never ceased to entertain the scruples and even the superstitions of the East.
  • The day following that on which the conversation we have related took place, the Count of Monte Cristo set out for Auteuil, accompanied by Ali and several attendants, and also taking with him some horses whose qualities he was desirous of ascertaining.
  • It was Danglars’ letter to the king’s attorney, which the Count of Monte Cristo, disguised as a clerk from the house of Thomson & French, had taken from the file against Edmond Dantes, on the day he had paid the two hundred thousand francs to M. de Boville.
  • At the end of the second day M. de Villefort received the following note:— "The person called the Count of Monte Cristo is an intimate acquaintance of Lord Wilmore, a rich foreigner, who is sometimes seen in Paris and who is there at this moment; he is also known to the Abbe Busoni, a Sicilian priest, of high repute in the East, where he has done much good."
  • But, ere he entered his travelling carriage, Albert, fearing that his expected guest might forget the engagement he had entered into, placed in the care of a waiter at the hotel a card to be delivered to the Count of Monte Cristo, on which, beneath the name of Vicomte Albert de Morcerf, he had written in pencil—"27, Rue du Helder, on the 21st May, half-past ten A.M."
  • But notwithstanding the serene sky, the gracefully formed boats, and the golden light in which the whole scene was bathed, the Count of Monte Cristo, wrapped in his cloak, could think only of this terrible voyage, the details of which were one by one recalled to his memory.
  • …repeatedly at Albert, in order to observe the impressions which he doubted not had been made on him by the words of their entertainer; but whether with his usual carelessness he had paid but little attention to him, whether the explanation of the Count of Monte Cristo with regard to duelling had satisfied him, or whether the events which Franz knew of had had their effect on him alone, he remarked that his companion did not pay the least regard to them, but on the contrary ate like a…
  • At the moment when the hand of the massive time-piece, representing Endymion asleep, pointed to nine on its golden face, and the hammer, the faithful type of mechanical thought, struck nine times, the name of the Count of Monte Cristo resounded in its turn, and as if by an electric shock all the assembly turned towards the door.
  • I cannot return you many thanks for the drive of yesterday; but, after all, I ought not to blame you for the misconduct of your horses, more especially as it procured me the pleasure of an introduction to the Count of Monte Cristo,—and certainly that illustrious personage, apart from the millions he is said to be so very anxious to dispose of, seemed to me one of those curiously interesting problems I, for one, delight in solving at any risk, even if it were to necessitate another…
  • …as to leave it doubtful whether it were not artificial so little did its jetty glossiness assimilate with the deep wrinkles stamped on his features—a person, in a word, who, although evidently past fifty, desired to be taken for not more than forty, bent forwards from the carriage door, on the panels of which were emblazoned the armorial bearings of a baron, and directed his groom to inquire at the porter’s lodge whether the Count of Monte Cristo resided there, and if he were within.
  • Three days after the scene we have just described, namely towards five o’clock in the afternoon of the day fixed for the signature of the contract between Mademoiselle Eugenie Danglars and Andrea Cavalcanti,—whom the banker persisted in calling prince,—a fresh breeze was stirring the leaves in the little garden in front of the Count of Monte Cristo’s house, and the count was preparing to go out.
  • First she fancied she saw her stepmother threatening her, then Morrel stretched his arms towards her; sometimes mere strangers, like the Count of Monte Cristo came to visit her; even the very furniture, in these moments of delirium, seemed to move, and this state lasted till about three o’clock in the morning, when a deep, heavy slumber overcame the young girl, from which she did not awake till daylight.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo," continued the servant, "begs these gentlemen’s permission to wait upon them as their neighbor, and he will be honored by an intimation of what time they will please to receive him."
  • "The Count of Monte Cristo?" cried Morrel, throwing away his cigar and hastening to the carriage; "I should think we would see him.
  • Eugenie," continued the baroness, turning towards her daughter, "this is the Count of Monte Cristo."
  • "Baroness," said Danglars, "give me leave to present to you the Count of Monte Cristo, who has been most warmly recommended to me by my correspondents at Rome.
  • A servant, wearing a livery of considerable style and richness, appeared at the threshold, and, placing two cards in the landlord’s hands, who forthwith presented them to the two young men, he said, "Please to deliver these, from the Count of Monte Cristo to Viscomte Albert de Morcerf and M. Franz d’Epinay.
  • "Never mind," continued the young man, "smuggler or not, you must agree, mother dear, as you have seen him, that the Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkable man, who will have the greatest success in the salons of Paris.
  • "To the Champs Elysees," said the general; "the Count of Monte Cristo’s.
  • " ’Then,’ remarked the president, ’the Count of Monte Cristo knows nothing of your present proceedings?
  • Morrel," said Chateau-Renaud, "will you apprise the Count of Monte Cristo that M. de Morcerf is arrived, and we are at his disposal?"
  • An unexpected incident, in the affair of murder and theft at the Count of Monte Cristo’s, in which he nearly fell a victim, deprives us of the pleasure of seeing M. de Villefort."
  • "Let me assure you, madame," said Lucien, "that had I really the sum you mention at my disposal, I would employ it more profitably than in troubling myself to obtain particulars respecting the Count of Monte Cristo, whose only merit in my eyes consists in his being twice as rich as a nabob.
  • As the count’s title sounded on his ear he rose, and addressing his colleagues, who were members of one or the other Chamber, he said,—"Gentlemen, pardon me for leaving you so abruptly; but a most ridiculous circumstance has occurred, which is this,—Thomson & French, the Roman bankers, have sent to me a certain person calling himself the Count of Monte Cristo, and have given him an unlimited credit with me.
  • …Egyptian campaign, followed with his eye as the translator read aloud:— " ’I, El-Kobbir, a slave-merchant, and purveyor of the harem of his highness, acknowledge having received for transmission to the sublime emperor, from the French lord, the Count of Monte Cristo, an emerald valued at eight hundred thousand francs; as the ransom of a young Christian slave of eleven years of age, named Haidee, the acknowledged daughter of the late lord Ali Tepelini, pasha of Yanina, and of Vasiliki,…

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  • For Stacey there was The Count of Monte Cristo; for me, The Three Musketeers; and for Christopher-John and Little Man, two different volumes of Aesop’s Fables.
    Mildred D. Taylor  --  Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
  • I was a bit light on home comforts, but I had in my rucksack a DVD player and a DVD of my favorite movie, The Count of Monte Cristo, from the novel by Alexandre Dumas pere.
    Marcus Luttrell  --  Lone Survivor

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