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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • I will send you to Constantinople.
  • You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear.
  • Now I can promise you, that a Frenchman might show himself in public, either in Tunis, Constantinople, Bagdad, or Cairo, without being treated in that way.
  • She is a slave whom I bought at Constantinople, madame, the daughter of a prince.
  • Why, simply from the circumstance of my having bought her one day, as I was passing through the market at Constantinople.
  • Given at Constantinople, by authority of his highness, in the year 1247 of the Hegira.
  • I, who have a seraglio at Cairo, one at Smyrna, and one at Constantinople, preside at a wedding?
  • It is you who, sent by him to Constantinople, to treat with the emperor for the life or death of your benefactor, brought back a false mandate granting full pardon!
  • The name of the French officer who had been sent to Constantinople resounded on all sides amongst our Palikares; it was evident that he brought the answer of the emperor, and that it was favorable.
  • As she was coming down, she thought she recognized the French officer who had been sent to Constantinople, and in whom my father placed so much confidence; for he knew that all the soldiers of the French emperor were naturally noble and generous.
  • …from the French lord, the Count of Monte Cristo, an emerald valued at eight hundred thousand francs; as the ransom of a young Christian slave of eleven years of age, named Haidee, the acknowledged daughter of the late lord Ali Tepelini, pasha of Yanina, and of Vasiliki, his favorite; she having been sold to me seven years previously, with her mother, who had died on arriving at Constantinople, by a French colonel in the service of the Vizier Ali Tepelini, named Fernand Mondego.
  • "No," replied Haidee, "he did not dare to keep us, so we were sold to some slave-merchants who were going to Constantinople.
  • "Did you know me better," returned the count, smiling, "you would not give one thought of such a thing for a traveller like myself, who has successively lived on maccaroni at Naples, polenta at Milan, olla podrida at Valencia, pilau at Constantinople, karrick in India, and swallows’ nests in China.

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  • Turkey renamed Constantinople to Istanbul in 1930.
  • Candide’s Voyage to Constantinople
    Voltaire  --  Candide

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