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peasant
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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peasant
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • So that, thanks to her friend’s generosity, Teresa was the most beautiful and the best-attired peasant near Rome.
  • He found the troop in the glade, supping off the provisions exacted as contributions from the peasants; but his eye vainly sought Rita and Cucumetto among them.
  • The three carbineers looked about carefully on every side, saw the young peasants, and galloping up, began to question them.
  • Through the crevices in the granite he had seen the two young peasants talking with the carbineers, and guessed the subject of their parley.
  • Luigi wore the very picturesque garb of the Roman peasant at holiday time.
  • They both mingled, as they had leave to do, with the servants and peasants.
  • We need hardly add that these peasant costumes, like those of the young women, were brilliant with gold and jewels.
  • They were attired as peasants of Albano, Velletri, Civita-Castellana, and Sora.
  • The Count of San-Felice pointed out Teresa, who was hanging on Luigi’s arm in a group of peasants.
  • The next day, at the usual hour, the two young peasants were on the borders of the forest.
  • From the day on which the bandit had been saved by the two young peasants, he had been enamoured of Teresa, and had sworn she should be his.
  • As for Albert, he was busily occupied throwing bouquets at a carriage full of Roman peasants that was passing near him.
  • There,—that calash filled with Roman peasants.
  • But, in spite of Albert’s hope, the day passed unmarked by any incident, excepting two or three encounters with the carriage full of Roman peasants.
  • The young peasant girl, at first timid and scared, soon recovered herself.
  • It would add greatly to the effect if the countess would join us in the costume of a peasant from Puzzoli or Sorrento.
  • "To make us between now and to-morrow two Roman peasant costumes," returned Albert.
  • It is almost needless to say that the flirtation between Albert and the fair peasant continued all day.
  • The harlequin had reassumed her peasant’s costume, and as she passed she raised her mask.
  • Albert attributed to Franz’s absence the extreme kindness of the fair peasant in raising her mask.
  • In order that there might be no confusion, Franz wore his peasant’s costume.
  • Instantly a mask, wearing the well-known costume of a peasant woman, snatched his moccoletto from him without his offering any resistance.
  • Franz was too far off to hear what they said; but, without doubt, nothing hostile passed, for he saw Albert disappear arm-in-arm with the peasant girl.
  • They knew full well that this fugitive must be a bandit; but there is an innate sympathy between the Roman brigand and the Roman peasant and the latter is always ready to aid the former.
  • Franz took the letter, and read:— Tuesday evening, at seven o’clock, descend from your carriage opposite the Via dei Pontefici, and follow the Roman peasant who snatches your torch from you.
  • If the fair peasant wishes to carry matters any further, we shall find her, or rather, she will find us to-morrow; then she will give me some sign or other, and I shall know what I have to do.
  • The permission to do what he liked with the carriage pleased him above all, for the fair peasants had appeared in a most elegant carriage the preceding evening, and Albert was not sorry to be upon an equal footing with them.
  • "What?" cried Franz, "was Luigi Vampa in the carriage with the Roman peasants?"
  • "What!" exclaimed Franz, "the peasant girl who snatched his mocoletto from him"— "Was a lad of fifteen," replied Peppino.
  • The weak man talks of burdens he can raise, the timid of giants he can confront, the poor of treasures he spends, the most humble peasant, in the height of his pride, calls himself Jupiter.
  • She then returned to her room, calling for help as loudly as she could, when suddenly her window, which was twenty feet from the ground, was opened, a young peasant jumped into the chamber, seized her in his arms, and with superhuman skill and strength conveyed her to the turf of the grass-plot, where she fainted.
  • While the three gentlemen walked along the Piazza de Spagni and the Via Frattina, which led directly between the Fiano and Rospoli palaces, Franz’s attention was directed towards the windows of that last palace, for he had not forgotten the signal agreed upon between the man in the mantle and the Transtevere peasant.
  • At the second turn, a bunch of fresh violets, thrown from a carriage filled with harlequins, indicated to Albert that, like himself and his friend, the peasants had changed their costume, also; and whether it was the result of chance, or whether a similar feeling had possessed them both, while he had changed his costume they had assumed his.
  • The next morning, at nine o’clock, he entered Franz’s room, followed by a tailor, who had eight or ten Roman peasant costumes on his arm; they selected two exactly alike, and charged the tailor to sew on each of their hats about twenty yards of ribbon, and to procure them two of the long silk sashes of different colors with which the lower orders decorate themselves on fete-days.
  • From every street and every corner drove carriages filled with clowns, harlequins, dominoes, mummers, pantomimists, Transteverins, knights, and peasants, screaming, fighting, gesticulating, throwing eggs filled with flour, confetti, nosegays, attacking, with their sarcasms and their missiles, friends and foes, companions and strangers, indiscriminately, and no one took offence, or did anything but laugh.
  • What I know is, that, like a fool, a greater fool than he of whom I spoke just now, I mistook for this peasant girl a young bandit of fifteen or sixteen, with a beardless chin and slim waist, and who, just as I was about to imprint a chaste salute on his lips, placed a pistol to my head, and, aided by seven or eight others, led, or rather dragged me, to the Catacombs of St. Sebastian, where I found a highly educated brigand chief perusing Caesar’s ’Commentaries,’ and who deigned to…
  • Before daybreak he would awake, leave the inn after rigorously paying his bill, and reaching the forest, he would, under pretence of making studies in painting, test the hospitality of some peasants, procure himself the dress of a woodcutter and a hatchet, casting off the lion’s skin to assume that of the woodman; then, with his hands covered with dirt, his hair darkened by means of a leaden comb, his complexion embrowned with a preparation for which one of his old comrades had given…
  • "Well," said Morcerf, "for three days I believed myself the object of the attentions of a masque, whom I took for a descendant of Tullia or Poppoea, while I was simply the object of the attentions of a contadina, and I say contadina to avoid saying peasant girl.

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  • Most people in the Middle Ages were peasants.
  • In 1932 a peasant revolt in Su County China stopped collection of the poppy tax.

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