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Plato
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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Plato
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • "Alas, no," said Albert; "nor even ancient Greek, my dear count; never had Homer or Plato a more unworthy scholar than myself."
  • …upon Debray,—an expression which seemed to imply that she understood all her mother’s amorous and pecuniary relationships with the intimate secretary; moreover, she saw that Eugenie detested Debray,—not only because he was a source of dissension and scandal under the paternal roof, but because she had at once classed him in that catalogue of bipeds whom Plato endeavors to withdraw from the appellation of men, and whom Diogenes designated as animals upon two legs without feathers.

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  • Plato famously said, "We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light."
  • I remember something Mrs. Harbor once said on one of her crazy tangents in English: that Plato believed that the whole world—everything we can see—was just like shadows on a cave wall.
    Lauren Oliver  --  Before I Fall

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