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opera
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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opera
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • The opera of "Parisina" was announced for representation, and the principal actors were Coselli, Moriani, and La Specchia.
  • I have a party at my house to-night, and therefore cannot possibly remain till the end of the opera.
  • He has composed two or three comic operas, written four or five articles in the Siecle, and voted five or six years on the ministerial side.
  • Wait; then, during the day, tell Rosa that when I leave the Opera I will sup with her as she wishes.
  • Balls, parties, and fetes are over; the Italian opera is in London; the French opera everywhere except in Paris.
  • Balls, parties, and fetes are over; the Italian opera is in London; the French opera everywhere except in Paris.
  • The conditions are favorable; what else was opera invented for?
  • To ask for an engagement at the Opera.
  • Were you at the opera yesterday?
  • No one told me you were, but you have frequently been seen at the opera with a young and lovely woman.
  • You procure your mistresses from the opera, the Vaudeville, or the Varietes; I purchased mine at Constantinople; it cost me more, but I have nothing to fear.
  • I have promised to escort to the Academie a Greek princess of my acquaintance who has never seen your grand opera, and who relies on me to conduct her thither.
  • The pretext of an opera engagement was so much the more feasible, as there chanced to be on that very night a more than ordinary attraction at the Academie Royale.
  • Her opera-glass was so fixedly directed towards them, that Franz saw it would be cruel not to satisfy her curiosity; and, availing himself of one of the privileges of the spectators of the Italian theatres, who use their boxes to hold receptions, the two friends went to pay their respects to the countess.
  • To no class of persons is the presentation of a gratuitous opera-box more acceptable than to the wealthy millionaire, who still hugs economy while boasting of carrying a king’s ransom in his waistcoat pocket.
  • Owing to the very judicious plan of dividing the two acts of the opera with a ballet, the pauses between the performances are very short, the singers in the opera having time to repose themselves and change their costume, when necessary, while the dancers are executing their pirouettes and exhibiting their graceful steps.
  • And so—being, beautiful, witty, somewhat talented, as the comic operas say, and rich—and that is happiness, sir—why do you call me unhappy?
  • Owing to the very judicious plan of dividing the two acts of the opera with a ballet, the pauses between the performances are very short, the singers in the opera having time to repose themselves and change their costume, when necessary, while the dancers are executing their pirouettes and exhibiting their graceful steps.
  • "But, since you go out with Haidee, and sometimes even take her to the opera"— "Well?"
  • He is going to the opera.
  • I depend on you to accompany me to the opera; and if you can, bring Chateau-Renaud with you.
  • On his return home, Albert expressed his wish to Franz Debray, and Morrel, to see them at the opera that evening.
  • Both got into Albert’s coupe; and, as the young man had no reason to conceal where he was going, he called aloud, "To the opera."
  • Debray was not yet come, but Albert knew that he seldom lost a scene at the opera.
  • Without communicating his thoughts to his companion, he sat down, drew out his opera-glass, and looked another way.
  • "An explanation at the opera?" said the count, with that calm tone and penetrating eye which characterize the man who knows his cause is good.
  • Albert wrote to request me to come to the opera, doubtless that I might be a witness to the insult he meant to offer you.
  • I never lose a note of this opera if I can avoid it; the music of William Tell is so sweet.
  • I guessed all; I followed him this evening to the opera, and, concealed in a parquet box, have seen all.
  • Yesterday afternoon I received a letter from M. de Morcerf, begging me to attend the opera.
  • It appears that after having challenged M. de Monte Cristo at the Opera yesterday, he apologized on the ground to-day.
  • This uneasiness, amounting almost to frenzy, arose from the report Morcerf’s adventure had made in the world, for the affair at the opera was generally known.
  • We will talk over our travels; and you, who have seen the whole world, will relate your adventures—you shall tell us the history of the beautiful Greek who was with you the other night at the Opera, and whom you call your slave, and yet treat like a princess.
  • Morrel only then recollected the letter he had received from the viscount, in which, without assigning any reason, he begged him to go to the opera, but he understood that something terrible was brooding.
  • He was turning this thought over in his brain for the twentieth time, when the door opened and Eugenie appeared, attired in a figured black satin dress, her hair dressed and gloves on, as if she were going to the Italian Opera.
  • Totally disregarding the business of the stage, he leaned from his box and began attentively scrutinizing the beauty of each pretty woman, aided by a powerful opera-glass; but, alas, this attempt to attract notice wholly failed; not even curiosity had been excited, and it was but too apparent that the lovely creatures, into whose good graces he was desirous of stealing, were all so much engrossed with themselves, their lovers, or their own thoughts, that they had not so much as noticed…
  • Danglars had, however, protested against showing himself in a ministerial box, declaring that his political principles, and his parliamentary position as member of the opposition party would not permit him so to commit himself; the baroness had, therefore, despatched a note to Lucien Debray, bidding him call for them, it being wholly impossible for her to go alone with Eugenie to the opera.
  • Albert threw himself on the divan, tore off the cover of two or three of the papers, looked at the theatre announcements, made a face seeing they gave an opera, and not a ballet; hunted vainly amongst the advertisements for a new tooth-powder of which he had heard, and threw down, one after the other, the three leading papers of Paris, muttering, "These papers become more and more stupid every day."
  • Andrea, on whose arm hung one of the most consummate dandies of the opera, was explaining to him rather cleverly, since he was obliged to be bold to appear at ease, his future projects, and the new luxuries he meant to introduce to Parisian fashions with his hundred and seventy-five thousand livres per annum.
  • In short, Madame Danglars, not being able personally to examine in detail the domestic economy and household arrangements of a man who gave away horses worth 30,000 francs and who went to the opera with a Greek slave wearing diamonds to the amount of a million of money, had deputed those eyes, by which she was accustomed to see, to give her a faithful account of the mode of life of this incomprehensible person.
  • The curtain rose, as usual, to an almost empty house, it being one of the absurdities of Parisian fashion never to appear at the opera until after the beginning of the performance, so that the first act is generally played without the slightest attention being paid to it, that part of the audience already assembled being too much occupied in observing the fresh arrivals, while nothing is heard but the noise of opening and shutting doors, and the buzz of conversation.
  • …queens, to protect, parties to unite, elections to direct; making more use of your cabinet with your pen and your telegraph than Napoleon did of his battle-fields with his sword and his victories; possessing five and twenty thousand francs a year, besides your place; a horse, for which Chateau-Renaud offered you four hundred louis, and which you would not part with; a tailor who never disappoints you; with the opera, the jockey-club, and other diversions, can you not amuse yourself?
  • "No," replied he; "I will not be caught like a fool at a first disclosure by a rendezvous under the clock, as they say at the opera-balls.
  • "Boulevard de l’Opera," said Beauchamp; "the second floor—a house with a balcony.
  • "That was an oversight, certainly," replied the count; "but tell me, does the Count of Morcerf never visit the Opera?
  • "It is quite immaterial to me," said Monte Cristo, "and it was very unnecessary to disturb me at the opera for such a trifle.
  • Albert had never been able to endure the Italian theatres, with their orchestras from which it is impossible to see, and the absence of balconies, or open boxes; all these defects pressed hard on a man who had had his stall at the Bouffes, and had shared a lower box at the Opera.

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  • She is a popular opera singer.
  • We’re going to the opera this evening.

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