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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • At this moment hope makes me despise their riches, which seem to me contemptible.
  • I should hate and despise myself as a coward did I desert the brave fellow in his present extremity.
  • I will be a sailor; instead of the costume of our fathers, which you despise, I will wear a varnished hat, a striped shirt, and a blue jacket, with an anchor on the buttons.
  • "Oh, this is too much," cried Hermine, choking, "you are worse than despicable."
  • Their agony formed part of their merit—if they were not seen alive, they were despised when dead.
  • "Ah, father," said Albert with a smile, "it is evident you do not know the Count of Monte Cristo; he despises all honors, and contents himself with those written on his passport."
  • It is not just that he should despise me so, without any reason.
  • "In truth, what Albert has just done is either very despicable or very noble," replied the baron.
  • My God, my Lord, I have long despised thee!
  • The true nobility laughed at him, the talented repelled him, and the honorable instinctively despised him.
  • With pleasure, sir; twenty francs are not to be despised.
  • I do not despise bankruptcies, believe me, but they must be those which enrich, not those which ruin.
  • The men are all infamous, and I am happy to be able now to do more than detest them—I despise them.
  • Oh, you despise them.
  • More than once she thought of revealing all to her grandmother, and she would not have hesitated a moment, if Maximilian Morrel had been named Albert de Morcerf or Raoul de Chateau-Renaud; but Morrel was of plebeian extraction, and Valentine knew how the haughty Marquise de Saint-Meran despised all who were not noble.
  • Although master of himself, Monte Cristo, scrutinized with irrepressible curiosity the magistrate whose salute he returned, and who, distrustful by habit, and especially incredulous as to social prodigies, was much more despised to look upon "the noble stranger," as Monte Cristo was already called, as an adventurer in search of new fields, or an escaped criminal, rather than as a prince of the Holy See, or a sultan of the Thousand and One Nights.

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  • She despises the people he has to work for.
  • They despise each other.

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