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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • —’Wretch!’ returned the old man, ’what hast thou done?’ and he gazed with terror on Rita, pale and bloody, a knife buried in her bosom.
  • Caligula or Nero, those treasure-seekers, those desirers of the impossible, would have accorded to the poor wretch, in exchange for his wealth, the liberty he so earnestly prayed for.
  • "Wretch!" she cried, "will you dare to tell me you did not know what you now reproach me with?"
  • And you suffer that, you wretch—you, who know his life and his crime?
  • Oh, send for some one to whom I can denounce the wretch!
  • You thought it a mercy then, miserable wretch!
  • " "Yes, my mother," said Albert, "I will return, and woe to the infamous wretch!
  • "Yes, miserable wretch!" cried Morcerf, "it is your fault."
  • "Well, be it so," at length said Eugenie; "return by the same road you came, and we will say nothing about you, unhappy wretch."
  • Now, after the oath I have just taken, and which I will keep, madame, dare you ask for mercy for that wretch!
  • "And so Mademoiselle Danglars"— "She could not endure the insult offered to us by that wretch, so she asked permission to travel."
  • Because the person who bears it is too highly favored by heaven to be the father of such a wretch as you.
  • And who is this wretch?
  • He was immediately recognized as one of them; the handkerchief was thrown down, and the iron-heeled shoe replaced on the foot of the wretch to whom it belonged.
  • God gives me strength to overcome a wild beast like you; in the name of that God I act,—remember that, wretch,—and to spare thee at this moment is still serving him.
  • "You remember," said the count, during the most profound silence, "that the unhappy wretch who came to rob me died at my house; the supposition is that he was stabbed by his accomplice, on attempting to leave it."
  • This Andrea was a wretch, a robber, an assassin, and yet his manners showed the effects of a sort of education, if not a complete one; he had been presented to the world with the appearance of an immense fortune, supported by an honorable name.
  • But one fine day I learned that the mover of this telegraph was only a poor wretch, hired for twelve hundred francs a year, and employed all day, not in studying the heavens like an astronomer, or in gazing on the water like an angler, or even in enjoying the privilege of observing the country around him, but all his monotonous life was passed in watching his white-bellied, black-clawed fellow insect, four or five leagues distant from him.
  • First, M. and Madame de Saint-Meran incurred his displeasure, so he poured out three drops of his elixir—three drops were sufficient; then followed Barrois, the old servant of M. Noirtier, who sometimes rebuffed this little wretch—he therefore received the same quantity of the elixir; the same happened to Valentine, of whom he was jealous; he gave her the same dose as the others, and all was over for her as well as the rest.
  • "Wretch!" exclaimed Haidee, her eyes flashing with rage; "he sold my father to the Turks, and the fortune he boasts of was the price of his treachery!
  • "Oh," cried the general, as if branded with a hot iron, "wretch,—to reproach me with my shame when about, perhaps, to kill me!
  • "I am the spectre of a wretch you buried in the dungeons of the Chateau d’If.
  • "For heaven’s sake, madame," said Villefort, with a firmness of expression not altogether free from harshness—"for heaven’s sake, do not ask pardon of me for a guilty wretch!

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  • Pity the poor wretch.
  • If you pay the blackmail, you will remain at the mercy of the unscrupulous wretch.

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