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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Yet perchance to-morrow deception will so act on me, that I shall, on compulsion, consider such a contemptible possession as the utmost happiness.
  • The aperture was already sufficiently large for him to enter, but by waiting, he could still cling to hope, and retard the certainty of deception.
  • Probabilities are deceptive.
  • The count’s first idea was that this was an artifice—a gross deception, to draw his attention from a minor danger in order to expose him to a greater.
  • —a lover’s deception, which the woman who has married that man ought certainly to forgive; but not so the lover who was to have married her.

  • There are no more uses of "deception" in the book.

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  • However, like all dangerous deceptions, the lies that clappers tell themselves wear seductive disguises.
    Neal Shusterman  --  Unwind
  • Not to know after all these years that deception can hide in plain sight?
    Cassandra Clare  --  City of Heavenly Fire

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