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attire
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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attire
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • The old man was attired in a suit of glistening watered silk, trimmed with steel buttons, beautifully cut and polished.
  • He was attired as he had been on the previous evening, and waved his pocket-handkerchief to his guest in token of adieu.
  • So that, thanks to her friend’s generosity, Teresa was the most beautiful and the best-attired peasant near Rome.
  • Teresa saw herself rich, superbly attired, and attended by a train of liveried domestics.
  • Carmela was attired like a woman of Sonnino.
  • They were attired as peasants of Albano, Velletri, Civita-Castellana, and Sora.
  • Vampa in this attire resembled a painting by Leopold Robert, or Schnetz.
  • Teresa uttered a cry of joy, and, without inquiring whence this attire came, or even thanking Luigi, darted into the grotto, transformed into a dressing-room.
  • I mean, Mercedes, that you are thus harsh and cruel with me, because you are expecting some one who is thus attired; but perhaps he whom you await is inconstant, or if he is not, the sea is so to him.
  • On the evening of the ball Teresa was attired in her best, her most brilliant ornaments in her hair, and gayest glass beads,—she was in the costume of the women of Frascati.
  • Villefort’s dusty garb, his costume, which was not of courtly cut, excited the susceptibility of M. de Breze, who was all astonishment at finding that this young man had the audacity to enter before the king in such attire.
  • Sitting alone, in the front of a box immediately opposite, but situated on the third row, was a woman of exquisite beauty, dressed in a Greek costume, which evidently, from the ease and grace with which she wore it, was her national attire.
  • The lady was surpassingly beautiful, while the rich magnificence of her attire drew all eyes upon her.
  • The less pretension there is in your attire, the better will be the effect, as you are a rich man.
  • We have forgotten to mention, that the count’s coachman was attired in a bear-skin, exactly resembling Odry’s in "The Bear and the Pasha;" and the two footmen behind were dressed up as green monkeys, with spring masks, with which they made grimaces at every one who passed.
  • He was dressed in a common gray blouse and velvet cap, but his carefully arranged hair, beard and mustache, all of the richest and glossiest black, ill accorded with his plebeian attire.
  • He dressed in the picturesque costume worn upon grand occasions by the inhabitants of the south of France, bearing equal resemblance to the style adopted both by the Catalans and Andalusians; while La Carconte displayed the charming fashion prevalent among the women of Arles, a mode of attire borrowed equally from Greece and Arabia.
  • This picturesque attire set him off to great advantage; and when he had bound the scarf around his waist, and when his hat, placed coquettishly on one side, let fall on his shoulder a stream of ribbons, Franz was forced to confess that costume has much to do with the physical superiority we accord to certain nations.
  • , was carelessly listening to a man of fifty or fifty-two years of age, with gray hair, aristocratic bearing, and exceedingly gentlemanly attire, and meanwhile making a marginal note in a volume of Gryphius’s rather inaccurate, but much sought-after, edition of Horace—a work which was much indebted to the sagacious observations of the philosophical monarch.
  • Morrel attributed Penelon’s embarrassment to the elegance of his attire; it was evident the good fellow had not gone to such an expense on his own account; he was, no doubt, engaged on board some other vessel, and thus his bashfulness arose from the fact of his not having, if we may so express ourselves, worn mourning for the Pharaon longer.
  • Her eyes, however, betrayed that perfect confidence which contradicted the girlish simplicity of this modest attire.
  • An hour after they stepped into their calash, both dressed in feminine attire.
  • He was turning this thought over in his brain for the twentieth time, when the door opened and Eugenie appeared, attired in a figured black satin dress, her hair dressed and gloves on, as if she were going to the Italian Opera.
  • Mercedes was much changed within the last few days; not that even in her days of fortune she had ever dressed with the magnificent display which makes us no longer able to recognize a woman when she appears in a plain and simple attire; nor indeed, had she fallen into that state of depression where it is impossible to conceal the garb of misery; no, the change in Mercedes was that her eye no longer sparkled, her lips no longer smiled, and there was now a hesitation in uttering the…
  • …proceedings relative to the dissolution of the marriage-contract were being carried on at the house of M. de Villefort, Monte Cristo had paid his visit to the Count of Morcerf, who, in order to lose no time in responding to M. Danglars’ wishes, and at the same time to pay all due deference to his position in society, donned his uniform of lieutenant-general, which he ornamented with all his crosses, and thus attired, ordered his finest horses and drove to the Rue de la Chausse d’Antin.

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  • formal attire
  • de Breze, who was all astonishment at finding that this young man had the audacity to enter before the king in such attire.
    Dumas, Alexandre  --  The Count of Monte Cristo

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