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The Count of Monte Cristo
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recollect
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • She would invoke the past, recall old recollections;
  • At this Fernand recollected her threat of dying if Edmond died, and dropped again heavily on his seat.
  • "Now I recollect," said the afflicted old father; "my poor boy told me yesterday he had got a small case of coffee, and another of tobacco for me!"
  • "And one which will go far to efface the recollection of his father’s conduct," added the incorrigible marquise.
  • Many of our readers may be able to recollect how formidable such an accusation became in the period at which our story is dated.
  • He was, if I recollect, arrested in a tavern, in company with a great many others.
  • The name of Sinbad the Sailor, as may well be supposed, awakened in him a world of recollections, as had the name of the Count of Monte Cristo on the previous evening.
  • And now, good-night; go to your rooms, and try to sleep away all recollections of this evening.
  • Nothing but the recollection of his oath gave him strength to proceed.
  • He then recollected that he had not eaten or drunk for four-and-twenty hours.
  • Dantes recollected that his hair and beard had not been cut all the time he was at the Chateau d’If.
  • Do not you recollect, I came about six weeks ago to plead for clemency, as I come to-day to plead for justice.
  • I recollect now; it was a very serious charge.
  • Do you recollect the words in which the information against you was formulated?
  • Recollect, our only desire is to carry out, in a fitting manner, the last wishes of our friend.
  • "Oh, I recollect him perfectly," cried M. de Boville; "he was crazy."
  • You have a good memory, sir, to recollect dates so well.
  • "I recollect this, because the poor devil’s death was accompanied by a singular incident."
  • Recollect the ancient Romans of the Circus, and the sports where they killed three hundred lions and a hundred men.
  • As Dantes spoke, Villefort gazed at his ingenuous and open countenance, and recollected the words of Renee, who, without knowing who the culprit was, had besought his indulgence for him.
  • It might, for the cabin door was open—and—stay; now I recollect,—Danglars himself passed by just as Captain Leclere was giving me the packet for the grand marshal.
  • Each step he trod oppressed his heart with fresh emotion; his first and most indelible recollections were there; not a tree, not a street, that he passed but seemed filled with dear and cherished memories.
  • Ah, I recollect, you asked for a place at my window; you shall have it; but let us first sit down to table, for here comes the servant to inform us that breakfast is ready.
  • The author of this history, who has resided five or six years in Italy, does not recollect to have ever seen a ceremony interrupted by one of those events so common in other countries.
  • Except the recollection of the line of politics his father had adopted, and which might interfere, unless he acted with the greatest prudence, with his own career, Gerard de Villefort was as happy as a man could be.
  • This brought back to Franz, in spite of himself, the recollection of the terror with which the count had inspired the Countess G——, and her firm conviction that the man in the opposite box was a vampire.
  • When he withdrew from the scene of his painful recollections, they both accompanied him downstairs, reiterating their hope that he would come again whenever he pleased, and assuring him that their poor dwelling would ever be open to him.
  • Perhaps the delight his studies afforded him left no room for such thoughts; perhaps the recollection that he had pledged his word (on which his sense of honor was keen) kept him from referring in any way to the possibilities of flight.
  • "Ah, yes—true, mademoiselle," exclaimed Monte Cristo as if this simple explanation was sufficient to revive the recollection he sought.
  • I then recollected you gave a breakfast this morning, and here I am.
  • The old man signified that he recollected him.
  • Recollect that Parisian gossip has spoken of a marriage between myself and Mlle.
  • If his excellency will recollect—if he will think"— "Ah, true," observed Monte Cristo; "I recollect now.
  • If his excellency will recollect—if he will think"— "Ah, true," observed Monte Cristo; "I recollect now.
  • No, monsieur, and yet I recollect all things as clearly as if they had happened but then.
  • "Ah, I recollect," replied the count; "did you not say something of an infant?"
  • No excellency, I do not recollect telling you that.
  • "Yes," said Monte Cristo "I perfectly recollect him; I think he was your colleague."
  • Recollect what our excellent father so often told us, ’It was no Englishman that thus saved us.’
  • "It is strange, but neither do I recollect meeting with you," observed Valentine, raising her beautiful eyes to the count.
  • Why, do you not recollect the name of the celebrated bandit by whom I was made prisoner?
  • Do you not recollect, Morcerf, his telling us so at your breakfast?
  • I recollect coming for my mother to look at it when M. de Saint-Meran advertised it for sale two or three years ago.
  • Recollect the seven fat and the seven lean kine.
  • "It is M. Maximilian Morrel," said she; "the son of that good merchant of Marseilles, whom you doubtless recollect."
  • You recollect that sad night, when you were half-expiring on that bed in the red damask room, while I, scarcely less agitated than you, awaited your delivery.
  • It is a chain of recollections—an idea which carries you back to other times, to other places—which, very likely, have no connection with the present time and place.
  • But I recollect perfectly one thing, that, being unwilling to let such talents as mine sleep, I wished to try upon the Arabs the new pistols that had been given to me.
  • Each word that fell from his companion’s lips seemed fraught with the mysteries of science, as worthy of digging out as the gold and diamonds in the mines of Guzerat and Golconda, which he could just recollect having visited during a voyage made in his earliest youth.
  • I uttered a cry of joy; the only moments of sadness I had known since the assassination of the procureur were caused by the recollection that I had abandoned this child.
  • "No, indeed," replied Madame de Villefort; "and yet it appears to me, sir, that if I had met you anywhere, the recollection of you must have been imprinted on my memory."
  • It will be recollected that the new, or rather old, acquaintances of the Count of Monte Cristo, residing in the Rue Meslay, were no other than Maximilian, Julie, and Emmanuel.
  • In the ray of light which entered by the narrow window of his cell, he held open in his left hand, of which alone, it will be recollected, he retained the use, a sheet of paper, which, from being constantly rolled into a small compass, had the form of a cylinder, and was not easily kept open.
  • Fearing, however, to make use of any valuable piece of paper, I hesitated for a moment, then recollected that I had seen in the famous breviary, which was on the table beside me, an old paper quite yellow with age, and which had served as a marker for centuries, kept there by the request of the heirs.
  • M. de Villefort heard of him at Marseilles, and M. Danglars recollects having seen him.
  • The servant announced the young man; but the banker, recollecting what had transpired the day before, did not wish him admitted.
  • Ask him, sir, if he recollects the words he uttered in the garden of this house on the night of Madame de Saint-Meran’s death.
  • It was therefore necessary, before everything else, and at all risks, that I should cause all traces of the past to disappear—that I should destroy every material vestige; too much reality would always remain in my recollection.
  • Beside him glided Caderousse, whose desire to partake of the good things provided for the wedding-party had induced him to become reconciled to the Dantes, father and son, although there still lingered in his mind a faint and unperfect recollection of the events of the preceding night; just as the brain retains on waking in the morning the dim and misty outline of a dream.
  • But he who was addressed stood there, stupefied, bewildered, stunned; his haggard eyes glanced around, as if in search of the traces of some terrible event, and with his clinched hands he seemed striving to shut out horrible recollections.
  • All the pious ideas that had been so long forgotten, returned; he recollected the prayers his mother had taught him, and discovered a new meaning in every word; for in prosperity prayers seem but a mere medley of words, until misfortune comes and the unhappy sufferer first understands the meaning of the sublime language in which he invokes the pity of heaven!
  • You could not apply to any one better able to inform you on all these points, for I knew him when he was a child, and one day that I fell into his hands, going from Ferentino to Alatri, he, fortunately for me, recollected me, and set me free, not only without ransom, but made me a present of a very splendid watch, and related his history to me.
  • In after years, whether he had forgotten this interchange of presents, which ought to have cemented our friendship, or whether he did not recollect me, he sought to take me, but, on the contrary, it was I who captured him and a dozen of his band.
  • Partly to drown the recollections of the past that haunted me, partly to supply the wants of the poor widow, I eagerly returned to my trade of smuggler, which had become more easy since that relaxation of the laws which always follows a revolution.
  • And how far back into the past do your recollections extend?
  • I love retirement and silence, because I can live with my thoughts and recollections of past days.
  • Has the law a memory for all those soft recollections you endeavor to recall?
  • These recollections were dwelt upon with some pleasure by Danglars, and restored him to some degree of tranquillity.
  • And have you any recollection of your country?
  • Besides, the manner in which Beauchamp had closed the conference left a bitter recollection in his heart.
  • And, in addition to this, everything forgotten or unperceived before presented itself now to his recollection.
  • "Why do you mention my father?" stammered he; "why do you mingle a recollection of him with the affairs of today?"
  • "What man?" said Andrea carelessly, apparently forgetting him whom he but too well recollected.
  • Yes, that is true; but I should not have recollected it if you had not reminded me.
  • The latter recollected the terrible caution of Monte Cristo; she fancied that the hand not holding the phial clasped a long sharp knife.
  • Truly, madame, I recollect M. Debray told me—apropos, what is become of him?
  • "I do not recollect it," said Haidee.
  • You know I used to be a famous cook; do you recollect how you used to lick your fingers?
  • Ah, you are only one and twenty, and can forget the past; I am fifty, and am obliged to recollect it.
  • "I am neither the Abbe Busoni nor Lord Wilmore," said Monte Cristo; "think again,—do you not recollect me?"
  • "Yes," said Maximilian, "I recollect the project, of which I highly approved."
  • Recollect what I told you when you asked me to propose you.
  • Do you recollect that ball, count, where you produced such an effect?
  • My position is like that of a person wounded in a dream; he feels the wound, though he cannot recollect when he received it.
  • Do you recollect in the arbor of the Hotel des Postes, at Perugia, seeing a man in a brown cloak, whom your stepmother was questioning upon aqua tofana?
  • He recollected the call he had made upon him after the dinner at Auteuil, and then the visit the abbe had himself paid to his house on the day of Valentine’s death.
  • If it be but to carry away with me the recollection of such sweet moments, I could even thank you for chiding me, for it leaves me a gleam of hope, that if you did not expect me (and that indeed would be worse than vanity to suppose), at least I was in your thoughts.
  • From my earliest recollections, I have been beloved by no one—so much the worse; that has naturally led me to love no one—so much the better—now you have my profession of faith.
  • Albert was on the point of pronouncing his father’s name, when Monte Cristo gently held up his finger in token of reproach; the young man recollected his promise, and was silent.
  • More than this, the conversation which had just taken place between Mercedes and himself had awakened so many recollections in his heart that he felt it necessary to combat with them.
  • He put out his hand to remove the object; it was a fan which Madame de Villefort had left in the carriage; this fan awakened a recollection which darted through his mind like lightning.
  • It was quite evident, by her manner, that her uneasiness was not feigned; and Franz himself could not resist a feeling of superstitious dread—so much the stronger in him, as it arose from a variety of corroborative recollections, while the terror of the countess sprang from an instinctive belief, originally created in her mind by the wild tales she had listened to till she believed them truths.
  • "I do not recollect now all the various subjects of which we discoursed, madame," continued the count with perfect calmness; "but I perfectly remember that, falling into the error which others had entertained respecting me, you consulted me as to the health of Mademoiselle de Villefort."
  • While working night and day, I sometimes lose all recollection of the past, and then I experience the same sort of happiness I can imagine the dead feel; still, it is better than suffering.
  • He recollected that there was a small furnished house to let in the Rue de Saints Peres, where his mother would find a humble but decent lodging, and thither he intended conducting the countess.
  • Morrel only then recollected the letter he had received from the viscount, in which, without assigning any reason, he begged him to go to the opera, but he understood that something terrible was brooding.
  • No—it was somewhere—away from here—it was—I do not know—but it appears that this recollection is connected with a lovely sky and some religious fete; mademoiselle was holding flowers in her hand, the interesting boy was chasing a beautiful peacock in a garden, and you, madame, were under the trellis of some arbor.
  • A short time since I passed through Marseilles, and went to see the old place, which revived so many painful recollections; and in the evening I took a spade and dug in the corner of the garden where I had concealed my treasure.
  • I recollected that I was stabbed just as I was trampling the ground to fill up the hole; while doing so I had leaned against a laburnum; behind me was an artificial rockery, intended to serve as a resting-place for persons walking in the garden; in falling, my hand, relaxing its hold of the laburnum, felt the coldness of the stone.
  • Thus the poor sailor lives in the recollection of those who narrate his history; his terrible story is recited in the chimney-corner, and a shudder is felt at the description of his transit through the air to be swallowed by the deep.
  • But, on the contrary, the particulars which are given prove that Fernand Mondego, raised by Ali Pasha to the rank of governor-general, is no other than Count Fernand of Morcerf; then, recollecting the honor you had done me, in admitting me to your friendship, I hastened to you.
  • Well, on the day when your appointment as an officer of the Legion of honor was announced in the papers, we were all sitting with my grandfather, M. Noirtier; M. Danglars was there also—you recollect M. Danglars, do you not, Maximilian, the banker, whose horses ran away with my mother-in-law and little brother, and very nearly killed them?
  • Villefort had secluded himself, not to study, but to reflect; and with the door locked and orders given that he should not be disturbed excepting for important business, he sat down in his arm-chair and began to ponder over the events, the remembrance of which had during the last eight days filled his mind with so many gloomy thoughts and bitter recollections.
  • But through the door she fancied she saw the luminous eye of the count—that eye which lived in her memory, and the recollection overwhelmed her with so much shame that she asked herself whether any amount of gratitude could ever repay his adventurous and devoted friendship.
  • He had been struck to the heart by a frightful recollection—the conversation he had heard between the doctor and Villefort the night of Madame de Saint-Meran’s death, recurred to him; these symptoms, to a less alarming extent, were the same which had preceded the death of Barrois.
  • Debray, who perceived the gathering clouds, and felt no desire to witness the explosion of Madame Danglars’ rage, suddenly recollected an appointment, which compelled him to take his leave; while Monte Cristo, unwilling by prolonging his stay to destroy the advantages he hoped to obtain, made a farewell bow and departed, leaving Danglars to endure the angry reproaches of his wife.
  • While the count smiled at hearing this song, which made him lose sight of Andrea in the recollection of Benedetto, Madame Danglars was boasting to Monte Cristo of her husband’s strength of mind, who that very morning had lost three or four hundred thousand francs by a failure at Milan.
  • One fact more than the rest brought his friend "Sinbad the Sailor" back to his recollection, and that was the mysterious sort of intimacy that seemed to exist between the brigands and the sailors; and Pastrini’s account of Vampa’s having found refuge on board the vessels of smugglers and fishermen, reminded Franz of the two Corsican bandits he had found supping so amicably with the crew of the little yacht, which had even deviated from its course and touched at Porto-Vecchio for the…
  • Debray did not defend himself very warmly, for the idea had sometimes crossed his mind; still, when he recollected the independent, proud spirit of Eugenie, he positively rejected it as utterly impossible, though the same thought again continually recurred and found a resting-place in his heart.
  • "My dear count," said Albert, advancing to meet him, "permit me to repeat the poor thanks I offered last night, and to assure you that the remembrance of all I owe to you will never be effaced from my memory; believe me, as long as I live, I shall never cease to dwell with grateful recollection on the prompt and important service you rendered me; and also to remember that to you I am indebted even for my life."
  • "Go, sir," said the king; "and should I forget you (kings’ memories are short), do not be afraid to bring yourself to my recollection.
  • Andrea, who had often stayed there in his rides about Paris, recollected the Bell and Bottle inn; he turned around, saw the sign by the light of a reflected lamp, and having dismissed the child, giving him all the small coin he had about him, he began knocking at the door, very reasonably concluding that having now three or four hours before him he had best fortify himself against the fatigues of the morrow by a sound sleep and a good supper.
  • Now I recollect"— "What?"
  • "Ah," said the count, "that is a most conjugal reservation; I recollect that at Rome you said something of a projected marriage.
  • "Certainly," said Morcerf; "I recollect him perfectly.
  • "Monsieur," said Morrel, recovering his assurance as he proceeded, "do you recollect that a few days before the landing of his majesty the emperor, I came to intercede for a young man, the mate of my ship, who was accused of being concerned in correspondence with the Island of Elba?
  • "I will remember it," said the young man, "as selfish children recollect their parents when they want their aid.
  • "But during my visit to you the day before yesterday, sir, which you appear to recollect so well," replied Eugenie, "I saw you arranging a deposit—is not that the term?
  • "Don’t speak of Marseilles, I beg of you, Maximilian; that one word brings back my mother to my recollection—my angel mother, who died too soon for myself and all who knew her; but who, after watching over her child during the brief period allotted to her in this world, now, I fondly hope, watches from her home in heaven.
  • The strife had fairly begun, and the recollection of what they had seen half an hour before was gradually effaced from the young men’s minds, so much were they occupied by the gay and glittering procession they now beheld.

  • There are no more uses of "recollect" in the book.


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  • I think I recollect that she was away at college that year.
  • I don’t recollect her name, but I’d recognize her.

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