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inanimate
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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inanimate
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • The young man raised the arm, which fell back by its own weight, perfectly inanimate and helpless.
  • Noirtier’s eye still retained its inanimate expression.
  • Valentine was so pale, so cold, so inanimate that without listening to what was said to them they were seized with the fear which pervaded that house, and they flew into the passage crying for help.
  • Valentine had solved the problem, and was able easily to understand his thoughts, and to convey her own in return, and, through her untiring and devoted assiduity, it was seldom that, in the ordinary transactions of every-day life, she failed to anticipate the wishes of the living, thinking mind, or the wants of the almost inanimate body.
  • One might by the fearful swelling of the veins of his forehead and the contraction of the muscles round the eye, trace the terrible conflict which was going on between the living energetic mind and the inanimate and helpless body.
  • The globe of the lamp appeared of a reddish hue, and the flame, brightening before it expired, threw out the last flickerings which in an inanimate object have been so often compared with the convulsions of a human creature in its final agonies.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • But for a terrible moment, his mouth was inanimate, stunned.
    Dave Eggers  --  The Circle
  • It’s an inanimate object.
    Susan Ee  --  Angelfall

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