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agitate
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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agitate
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Edmond then cast his eyes scrutinizingly at the agitated and embarrassed Mercedes, and then again on the gloomy and menacing Fernand.
  • At the sight of this agitation Louis XVIII. pushed from him violently the table at which he was sitting.
  • You have, indeed, a noble nature, Edmond, and I see by your paleness and agitation what is passing in your heart at this moment.
  • "Hope!" faintly murmured Fernand, but the word seemed to die away on his pale agitated lips, and a convulsive spasm passed over his countenance.
  • Night came, and with it the preparation for departure, and these preparations served to conceal Dantes’ agitation.
  • Every eye was turned towards the young man who, spite of the agitation he could not but feel, advanced with dignity, and said, in a firm voice, "I am he; what is your pleasure with me?"
  • The agitation of Caderousse became extreme, and large drops of perspiration rolled from his heated brow.
  • He was calm; but the agitation of the night was legible in his pale and careworn visage.
  • No; my pride is to see the accused pale, agitated, and as though beaten out of all composure by the fire of my eloquence.
  • Danglars was joking in a friendly way, but Fernand looked pale and agitated.
  • There was a brief silence, during which the fixed, searching eye of the abbe was employed in scrutinizing the agitated features of the inn-keeper.
  • Luigi slowly relinquished Teresa’s arm, which he had held beneath his own, and Teresa, accompanied by her elegant cavalier, took her appointed place with much agitation in the aristocratic quadrille.
  • Teresa had yielded in spite of herself, but when she looked at the agitated countenance of the young man, she understood by his silence and trembling voice that something strange was passing within him.
  • During the night, between the 4th and 5th of September, Madame Morrel remained listening for every sound, and, until three o’clock in the morning, she heard her husband pacing the room in great agitation.
  • "What is there more?" said Debray, who had not failed to notice the agitation of Madame Danglars.
  • "I do not understand you, sir," said the baroness, trying to disguise the agitation of her voice and the flush of her face.
  • At last I mastered my agitation.
  • "Oh, dear grandmamma, are you worse?" exclaimed Valentine, perceiving all these signs of agitation.
  • It is easy to suppose that Morrel’s agitation would not escape the count’s penetrating eye.
  • "Is what true, madame?" inquired Danglars, visibly agitated.
  • "A visitor?" inquired Valentine, much agitated; "who is it?"
  • "It is six o’clock," said Madame de Villefort, evidently agitated.
  • "Yet conscience remains," remarked Madame de Villefort in an agitated voice, and with a stifled sigh.
  • "Rue de la Fontaine!" exclaimed Villefort in an agitated tone; "at what number?"
  • "But the child—the child, sir?" repeated the agitated mother.
  • Oh, I dare not—she forbade my sending for you; and, as you say, I am myself agitated, feverish and out of sorts.
  • Twice or thrice during the dance the young girl had glanced at Luigi, and each time she saw that he was pale and that his features were agitated, once even the blade of his knife, half drawn from its sheath, had dazzled her eyes with its sinister glare.
  • You recollect that sad night, when you were half-expiring on that bed in the red damask room, while I, scarcely less agitated than you, awaited your delivery.
  • An extreme nervous excitement and a strangely agitated sleep; she fancied this morning in her sleep that her soul was hovering above her body, which she at the same time watched.
  • When the afternoon arrived and he felt that the hour was drawing near, he wished for solitude, his agitation was extreme; a simple question from a friend would have irritated him.
  • Villefort, pale and agitated, ran to the window, put aside the curtain, and saw him pass, cool and collected, by two or three ill-looking men at the corner of the street, who were there, perhaps, to arrest a man with black whiskers, and a blue frock-coat, and hat with broad brim.
  • The surprise and agitation occasioned by this full confirmation of Franz’s former suspicion had no doubt imparted a corresponding expression to his features; for the countess, after gazing with a puzzled look at his face, burst into a fit of laughter, and begged to know what had happened.
  • The guests were still at table, and the heated and energetic conversation that prevailed betrayed the violent and vindictive passions that then agitated each dweller of the South, where unhappily, for five centuries religious strife had long given increased bitterness to the violence of party feeling.
  • But for one whose privilege it was to agitate that ocean of human waves, how many were received with a look of indifference or a sneer of disdain!
  • Caderousse, meanwhile, continued to pace the room in gloomy silence, sedulously avoiding the sight of his guest; but as soon as the stranger had completed his repast, the agitated inn-keeper went eagerly to the door and opened it.
  • "Where are you going?" cried the young girl, extending her hand through the opening, and seizing Maximilian by his coat, for she understood from her own agitated feelings that her lover’s calmness could not be real; "where are you going?"
  • On leaving the Chamber, Danglars, who had shown violent marks of agitation during the sitting, and been more bitter than ever against the ministry, re-entered his carriage, and told the coachman to drive to the Avenue des Champs-Elysees, No. 30.
  • The prisoner whom you there see pale, agitated, and alarmed, instead of—as is the case when a curtain falls on a tragedy—going home to sup peacefully with his family, and then retiring to rest, that he may recommence his mimic woes on the morrow,—is removed from your sight merely to be reconducted to his prison and delivered up to the executioner.
  • Overpowered with agitation, the poisoner succeeded in groping her way to the door, and reached her room in an agony of fear.
  • Then walking towards Morrel, he took his hand; the tumultuous agitation of the young man was succeeded by a profound stupor.
  • "Well, what is the matter, my dear?" asked the gentleman whose name the lady’s agitation revealed; "tell me what is the matter."
  • Listen to me, mother, and do not yield too much to agitation.
  • "King’s attorney?" said the president, stupefied, and without noticing the agitation which spread over the face of M. de Villefort; "king’s attorney?"
  • Just as they were beginning, in the English fashion, to leave the spoons in their cups, the door again opened and Danglars entered, visibly agitated.
  • His agitated features presented the appearance of pale and hideous terror.
  • At length a sense of dignity prevailed, and if she did not entirely master her agitation, she at least succeeded in preventing the fall of a single tear.
  • It was evident that Madame Danglars was suffering from that nervous irritability which women frequently cannot account for even to themselves; or that, as Debray had guessed, she had experienced some secret agitation that she would not acknowledge to any one.
  • If Valentine could have seen the trembling step and agitated countenance of Franz when he quitted the chamber of M. Noirtier, even she would have been constrained to pity him.
  • The procureur, who knew the political hatred which had formerly existed between M. Noirtier and the elder d’Epinay, well understood the agitation and anger which the announcement had produced; but, feigning not to perceive either, he immediately resumed the narrative begun by his wife.
  • Every minute she had expected that it would vanish and give place to another vision; but the man, instead of dissolving like a shadow, again approached her, and said in an agitated voice, "Now you may drink."
  • Oh, he laughed, and in that singular manner so peculiar to himself—half-malicious, half-ferocious; he almost immediately got up and took his leave; then, for the first time, I observed the agitation of my grandfather, and I must tell you, Maximilian, that I am the only person capable of discerning emotion in his paralyzed frame.
  • While he was thus agitated by gloomy uncertainties,—wretched waking dreams of grief,—the first rays of morning pierced his windows, and shone upon the pale blue paper on which he had just inscribed his justification of providence.
  • Valentine had raised herself upon her elbow, and had scarcely time to throw herself down on the bed and shade her eyes with her arm; then, trembling, agitated, and her heart beating with indescribable terror, she awaited the event.
  • At the same moment, that is, at nine o’clock in the morning, Albert de Morcerf, dressed in a black coat buttoned up to his chin, might have been seen walking with a quick and agitated step in the direction of Monte Cristo’s house in the Champs Elysees.
  • …of deep meaning, while Fernand, as he slowly paced behind the happy pair, who seemed, in their own unmixed content, to have entirely forgotten that such a being as himself existed, was pale and abstracted; occasionally, however, a deep flush would overspread his countenance, and a nervous contraction distort his features, while, with an agitated and restless gaze, he would glance in the direction of Marseilles, like one who either anticipated or foresaw some great and important event.
  • But he had been unable to send to Albert the following particulars, as the events had transpired after the messenger’s departure; namely, that the same day a great agitation was manifest in the House of Peers among the usually calm members of that dignified assembly.
  • All took their places, or rather the ladies formed a circle, while the gentlemen (more indifferent to the restraints of what Boileau calls the "energetic style") commented on the feverish agitation of Andrea, on M. Danglars’ riveted attention, Eugenie’s composure, and the light and sprightly manner in which the baroness treated this important affair.
  • "I am, sir," said the king, much agitated; "and recently we have had information that the Bonapartist clubs have had meetings in the Rue Saint-Jacques.
  • "Come," said Andrea, with sufficient nerve for his servant not to perceive his agitation, "what do you want?
  • "I do not deny it," returned the count; "but why are you thus agitated.
  • "Not at all," said Chateau-Renaud, slowly; "I think he is violently agitated.

  • There are no more uses of "agitate" in the book.


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  • Our goal is to agitate public unrest, so there will be a cry for change.
  • She gets agitated whenever the topic comes up.

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