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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • He advanced towards the angle, and summoning all his resolution, attacked the ground with the pickaxe.
  • During this time the empire made its last conscription, and every man in France capable of bearing arms rushed to obey the summons of the emperor.
  • "Monsieur," replied Dantes proudly, "it was only to summon assistance for you."
  • "Can all this force be summoned on my account?" thought he.
  • And Villefort’s father extended his hand to the bell-rope, to summon the servant whom his son had not called.
  • And raising himself by a final effort, in which he summoned all his faculties, he said,—"Monte Cristo, forget not Monte Cristo!"
  • The first act of Franz was to summon his landlord, who presented himself with his accustomed obsequiousness.
  • Emmanuel sighed, and summoned Cocles.
  • Franz, however, did not obey the summons till he had satisfied himself that the two men whose conversation he had overheard were at a sufficient distance to prevent his encountering them in his descent.
  • Edmond felt that the moment had arrived, summoned up all his courage, held his breath, and would have been happy if at the same time he could have repressed the throbbing of his veins.
  • I will summon him hither.
  • Albert summoned his servant, and ordered him to acquaint M. and Madame de Morcerf of the arrival of the Count of Monte Cristo.
  • A servant entered, summoned by Albert’s ring of the bell.
  • Have the French attendants been summoned to await her coming?
  • When Ali was wanted one stroke was given, two summoned Baptistin, and three Bertuccio.
  • The following day, about three o’clock, a single blow struck on the gong summoned Ali to the presence of the count.
  • Monte Cristo summoned the Greek attendant, and bade her inquire whether it would be agreeable to her mistress to receive his visit.
  • I summoned all my strength and courage to my support.
  • "Summon Bertuccio," said the count.
  • Yes; summoned by M. de Villefort, who is apparently as anxious to get Mademoiselle Valentine married as M. Danglars is to see Mademoiselle Eugenie settled.
  • Villefort, impassive as he was, was struck with this coincidence; and the tremulous voice of Dantes, surprised in the midst of his happiness, struck a sympathetic chord in his own bosom—he also was on the point of being married, and he was summoned from his own happiness to destroy that of another.
  • M. and Madame de Villefort bowed and left the room, giving orders that Valentine should be summoned to her grandfather’s presence, and feeling sure that she would have much to do to restore calmness to the perturbed spirit of the invalid.
  • The bell summoned him to his seat, and he entered the orchestra with Chateau-Renaud and Beauchamp.
  • At any other time Valentine would have seized the silken bell-pull and summoned assistance, but nothing astonished her in her present situation.
  • Valentine summoned every effort, and breathed with that regular respiration which announces tranquil sleep.
  • Now leave me or I will summon my servants to throw you out at the door.
  • "Valentine," said the count, "summon up all your courage; still the beatings of your heart; do not let a sound escape you, and feign to be asleep; then you will see."
  • As for me, I can never forget the pale complexion and black eyes of the young soldier, and whenever the angel of death summons me to another world, I am quite sure I shall recognize Selim.
  • Villefort retired to his study, and d’Avrigny left to summon the doctor of the mayoralty, whose office it is to examine bodies after decease, and who is expressly named "the doctor of the dead."
  • "Oh, that I do, and with infinite pleasure," answered Albert; "and so much the more readily as a letter received this morning from my father summons me to Paris, in consequence of a treaty of marriage (my dear Franz, do not smile, I beg of you) with a family of high standing, and connected with the very cream of Parisian society."
  • The sudden departure of Franz, after being summoned by M. Noirtier, had so much astonished every one, that the position of Madame de Villefort, left alone with the notary and the witnesses, became every moment more embarrassing.
  • Sometimes, but very rarely, my father summoned me and my mother to the terrace of the palace; these were hours of recreation for me, as I never saw anything in the dismal cavern but the gloomy countenances of the slaves and Selim’s fiery lance.
  • I had been tracked by a customs-officer, who had lost sight of me near the tavern; feeling certain that I intended to pass the night there, he had returned to summon his comrades, who just arrived in time to hear the report of the pistol, and to take me in the midst of such circumstantial proofs of my guilt as rendered all hopes of proving my innocence utterly futile.
  • Villefort, from his study, heard the successive noises which accompany the life of a house,—the opening and shutting of doors, the ringing of Madame de Villefort’s bell, to summon the waiting-maid, mingled with the first shouts of the child, who rose full of the enjoyment of his age.
  • The first three remained constantly in a small waiting-room, ready to obey the summons of a small golden bell, or to receive the orders of the Romaic slave, who knew just enough French to be able to transmit her mistress’s wishes to the three other waiting-women; the latter had received most peremptory instructions from Monte Cristo to treat Haidee with all the deference they would observe to a queen.
  • Even Ali, who had hastened to obey the Count’s summons, went forth from his master’s presence in charmed amazement at the unusual animation and pleasure depicted on features ordinarily so stern and cold; while, as though dreading to put to flight the agreeable ideas hovering over his patron’s meditations, whatever they were, the faithful Nubian walked on tiptoe towards the door, holding his breath, lest its faintest sound should dissipate his master’s happy reverie.
  • …the paragraph about you, although I had done nothing else but read it over to myself all the morning (you know you had told me all about it the previous evening), I felt so happy, and yet so nervous, at the idea of speaking your name aloud, and before so many people, that I really think I should have passed it over, but for the fear that my doing so might create suspicions as to the cause of my silence; so I summoned up all my courage, and read it as firmly and as steadily as I could.
  • "Did you ever occupy yourself," said he to Franz, "with the employment of time and the means of simplifying the summoning your servants?
  • Ali knows I generally smoke while I am taking my tea or coffee; he has heard that I ordered tea, and he also knows that I brought you home with me; when I summoned him he naturally guessed the reason of my doing so, and as he comes from a country where hospitality is especially manifested through the medium of smoking, he naturally concludes that we shall smoke in company, and therefore brings two chibouques instead of one—and now the mystery is solved.

  • There are no more uses of "summon" in the book.

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  • I was summoned to the principal’s office.
  • I summoned all my courage and walked into the room.

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