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repugnant
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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repugnant
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • But the first was repugnant to him.
  • Hunger made viands once repugnant, now acceptable; he held the plate in his hand for an hour at a time, and gazed thoughtfully at the morsel of bad meat, of tainted fish, of black and mouldy bread.
  • "Oh," said Morcerf, "this repugnance, if repugnance it may be called, is not all on my side."
  • "Oh," said Morcerf, "this repugnance, if repugnance it may be called, is not all on my side."
  • Any one but a man of exhaustless thirst for knowledge would have had pity on seeing the steward’s extraordinary repugnance for the count’s projected drive without the walls; but the Count was too curious to let Bertuccio off from this little journey.
  • "We were having a confidential conversation," returned Valentine; "she was owning to me her repugnance to the marriage with M. de Morcerf; and I, on the other hand, was confessing to her how wretched it made me to think of marrying M. d’Epinay."
  • During all this time, the general, on whom they thought to have relied as on a brother, manifested evidently signs of discontent and repugnance.
  • Now I cannot be sure of the approbation or disapprobation of a client who cannot speak, and as the object of his desire or his repugnance cannot be clearly proved to me, on account of his want of speech, my services here would be quite useless, and cannot be legally exercised.
  • The two ladies, pressing closely to one another, and drawing the bedclothes tightly around them, remained silent to this supplicating voice, repugnance and fear taking possession of their minds.
  • I must, however, do him the justice to add that he assured me if ever he had regretted the repugnance he felt to such a step it was on this occasion, because he thought the projected union would be a happy and suitable one.
  • It appeared impossible to the baroness that a man of such delightfully pleasing manners should entertain evil designs against her; besides, the most corrupt minds only suspect evil when it would answer some interested end—useless injury is repugnant to every mind.
  • The general appeared to be affected by a nervous tremor, which prevented his answering for some moments; then, overcoming his manifest repugnance, he pronounced the required oath, but in so low a tone as to be scarcely audible to the majority of the members, who insisted on his repeating it clearly and distinctly, which he did.
  • In spite of his repugnance to address the guards, Dantes turned to the nearest gendarme, and taking his hand,— "Comrade," said he, "I adjure you, as a Christian and a soldier, to tell me where we are going.
  • "Because," said the old man, "the natural repugnance to the commission of such a crime prevented you from thinking of it; and so it ever is because in simple and allowable things our natural instincts keep us from deviating from the strict line of duty.

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  • Her behavior is shocking and repugnant.
  • She does not further her cause with such irresponsible, insulting, and repugnant language.

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