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prudent
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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prudent
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Prison had made Edmond prudent, and he was desirous of running no risk whatever.
  • "And now, my dear boy," continued Noirtier, "I rely on your prudence to remove all the things which I leave in your care."
  • Spada, a prudent man, and greatly attached to his only nephew, a young captain of the highest promise, took paper and pen, and made his will.
  • Better study a little common prudence.
  • By all means, be as wise as Nestor and as prudent as Ulysses; I do more than permit, I exhort you.
  • Franz was prudent, and wished to learn all he possibly could concerning his host.
  • Except the recollection of the line of politics his father had adopted, and which might interfere, unless he acted with the greatest prudence, with his own career, Gerard de Villefort was as happy as a man could be.
  • "On my word," said Franz, "you are wise as Nestor and prudent as Ulysses, and your fair Circe must be very skilful or very powerful if she succeed in changing you into a beast of any kind."
  • At intervals he listened to learn if the noise had not begun again, and grew impatient at the prudence of the prisoner, who did not guess he had been disturbed by a captive as anxious for liberty as himself.
  • Villefort, therefore, gained nothing save the king’s gratitude (which was rather likely to injure him at the present time) and the cross of the Legion of Honor, which he had the prudence not to wear, although M. de Blacas had duly forwarded the brevet.
  • Cause her to lose a hundred thousand francs, and that would teach her prudence.
  • But you are a man of foresight and prudence, therefore you sent your luggage on before you.
  • "Be prudent, in any event," said the countess.
  • Now you are a man, and are able to give me advice; yet I repeat to you, Albert, be prudent.
  • He is extremely prudent and thoughtful.
  • Owing to this change, the worthy shipowner became at that moment—we will not say all powerful, because Morrel was a prudent and rather a timid man, so much so, that many of the most zealous partisans of Bonaparte accused him of "moderation"—but sufficiently influential to make a demand in favor of Dantes.
  • "Perfect, madame, as you have seen," replied the count; "and I frequently make use of it—with all possible prudence though, be it observed," he added with a smile of intelligence.
  • He contemplated with unspeakable delight the large diamond which shone on the major’s little finger; for the major, like a prudent man, in case of any accident happening to his bank-notes, had immediately converted them into an available asset.
  • Sir, my father is a man of great foresight and prudence.
  • "So you recommend"— "I recommend you to be prudent."
  • "That is not prudent," said Caderousse.
  • But the glass-cutter was a prudent man who had provided for all emergencies.
  • The last alternative seemed the most prudent, so he waited until twelve o’clock.
  • Act prudently.
  • Mercedes saw it and with the double instinct of woman and mother guessed all; but as she was prudent and strong-minded she concealed both her sorrows and her fears.
  • "Sir," he responded, "you are a stranger, and I believe you say yourself that a portion of your life has been spent in Oriental countries, so you are not aware how human justice, so expeditious in barbarous countries, takes with us a prudent and well-studied course."
  • Under the fixed and inquiring gaze levelled at him from under those beautiful black eyebrows, he prudently turned away, and calmed himself immediately, daunted by the power of a resolute mind.
  • Yes; I am calculating—by the way, Morcerf, that indirectly concerns you—I am calculating what the house of Danglars must have gained by the last rise in Haiti bonds; from 206 they have risen to 409 in three days, and the prudent banker had purchased at 206; therefore he must have made 300,000 livres.
  • With this consoling idea, I leave you, madame, and most prudent wife, without any conscientious reproach for abandoning you; you have friends left, and the ashes I have already mentioned, and above all the liberty I hasten to restore to you.
  • The recent events, the solitary and eccentric position of the count, his enormous, nay, almost incredible fortune, should have made men cautious, and have altogether prevented ladies visiting a house where there was no one of their own sex to receive them; and yet curiosity had been enough to lead them to overleap the bounds of prudence and decorum.
  • The count made a sign to Albert and they bowed to the ladies, and took their leave, Albert perfectly indifferent to Mademoiselle Danglars’ contempt, Monte Cristo reiterating his advice to Madame Danglars on the prudence a banker’s wife should exercise in providing for the future.
  • "How do I know?" replied Danglars; "gone, as every prudent man ought to be, to look after his own affairs, most likely.
  • We should presume too much on our own strength, and, like others, perhaps, be led astray by our blind confidence in each other’s prudence."
  • "My father has been a Jacobin more than anything else," said Villefort, carried by his emotion beyond the bounds of prudence; "and the senator’s robe, which Napoleon cast on his shoulders, only served to disguise the old man without in any degree changing him.
  • The Orientals are stronger than we are in cases of conscience, and, very prudently, have no hell—that is the point.

  • There are no more uses of "prudent" in the book.


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  • She was promoted to manager because she is so prudent.
  • Courage is dangerous without prudence.

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