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plebeian
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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plebeian
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Villefort, as we have seen, belonged to the aristocratic party at Marseilles, Morrel to the plebeian; the first was a royalist, the other suspected of Bonapartism.
  • He was dressed in a common gray blouse and velvet cap, but his carefully arranged hair, beard and mustache, all of the richest and glossiest black, ill accorded with his plebeian attire.
  • More than once she thought of revealing all to her grandmother, and she would not have hesitated a moment, if Maximilian Morrel had been named Albert de Morcerf or Raoul de Chateau-Renaud; but Morrel was of plebeian extraction, and Valentine knew how the haughty Marquise de Saint-Meran despised all who were not noble.
  • "It is true," said the baroness, with that strange simplicity sometimes met with among fashionable ladies, and of which plebeian intercourse can never entirely deprive them,—"it is very true that had not the Morcerfs hesitated, my daughter would have married Monsieur Albert.

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  • switched from designer labels to more plebeian clothes at Wal-Mart
  • Implicit in the play is a great divide between superiors and inferiors, patricians and plebeians.
    T.E. Kalem  --  Time, 1973  --  http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,907198,00.html#ixzz0YqB0cDQU(retrieved 12/05/09)

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