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maxim
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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maxim
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Villefort’s first impression was favorable; but he had been so often warned to mistrust first impulses, that he applied the maxim to the impression, forgetting the difference between the two words.
  • Madame de Villefort listened with avidity to these appalling maxims and horrible paradoxes, delivered by the count with that ironical simplicity which was peculiar to him.
  • "There is," said he, at the end of his meditations, "a clever maxim, which bears upon what I was saying to you some little while ago, and that is, that unless wicked ideas take root in a naturally depraved mind, human nature, in a right and wholesome state, revolts at crime.
  • "My dear fellow," replied Albert, with perfect ease of mind, "remember, for the future, Napoleon’s maxim, ’Never awaken me but for bad news;’ if you had let me sleep on, I should have finished my galop, and have been grateful to you all my life.

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  • The advisor often quotes the maxim that all politics is local.
  • Her actions conflict with the maxim that we don’t negotiate with terrorists.

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