To better see all uses of the word
indignant
in
The Count of Monte Cristo
please enable javascript.

indignant
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Edmond then resolved to try Jacopo, and offered him in return for his attention a share of his prize-money, but Jacopo refused it indignantly.
  • The deep glow of indignation suffused the cheeks of Dantes.
  • Questions and answers followed in a nonchalant manner that made Dantes indignant, for he felt that all the world should have for the poor abbe a love and respect equal to his own.
  • The injured husband goes through all the emotions of jealousy, until conviction seizes on his mind, and then, in a frenzy of rage and indignation, he awakens his guilty wife to tell her that he knows her guilt and to threaten her with his vengeance.
  • "Yes, I understand," was the reply contained in his look; and this look expressed a feeling of strong indignation, mixed with profound contempt.
  • Then can well understand your indignation, my dear Albert.
  • A murmur, or rather storm, of indignation burst from all parts of the assembly.
  • Albert’s lips scarcely whispered "Good-by," but his look was more explicit; it expressed a whole poem of restrained anger, proud disdain, and generous indignation.
  • Valentine turned her eyes away, and, with an indignant expression of pride and modest fear, exclaimed: "Sir, I think you have been guilty of an unparalleled intrusion, and that what you call protection is more like an insult."

  • There are no more uses of "indignant" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading