To better see all uses of the word
The Count of Monte Cristo
please enable javascript.

Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • the woman, who was ordinarily so querulous and indifferent to all who approached her, was suddenly transformed into the most smiling and attentive hostess.
  • The man who had performed this daring act with so much indifference wore the Transtevere costume.
  • My first sentiment was horror, the second indifference, the third curiosity.
  • "Which are your windows?" asked he of the count, with as much indifference as he could assume.
  • As for his suspicions, once on terra firma, once that he had seen the indifferent, if not friendly, appearance of his hosts, his anxiety had quite disappeared, or rather, at sight of the goat, had turned to appetite.
  • —all foreign artists, for, as you may perceive, I think but very indifferently of our French sculptors.
  • "These are but indifferent marbles in this ante-chamber," said Monte Cristo.
  • Come, do not affect indifference, but confess you were pleased to have it.
  • "That is extremely kind of you," said Monte Cristo with a tone of perfect indifference.
  • The only amusements left us are the indifferent races at the Champ de Mars and Satory.
  • The two women looked at this person whose presence they had entirely forgotten, and retired; but, as she left the apartment, Julie gave the stranger a supplicating glance, to which he replied by a smile that an indifferent spectator would have been surprised to see on his stern features.
  • As we have said, he perfectly understood the old man’s vocabulary, and if he did not use it more often, it was only indifference and ennui which prevented him from so doing.
  • Monte Cristo, although apparently indifferent, had not lost one word of this conversation, and his penetrating eye had even read a hidden secret in the embarrassed manner of the secretary.
  • Noirtier saw him seat himself with an appearance of perfect indifference, at the same time giving a side look at Valentine, which made her understand that she also was to remain in the room.
  • The world, however, is mistaken; my father abandons me from utter indifference, while my mother-in-law detests me with a hatred so much the more terrible because it is veiled beneath a continual smile.
  • In ten minutes after the strangers had departed, Franz was on the road to the Piazza de Spagni, listening with studied indifference to the learned dissertation delivered by Albert, after the manner of Pliny and Calpurnius, touching the iron-pointed nets used to prevent the ferocious beasts from springing on the spectators.
  • "Our civil dissensions are now happily extinguished, mother," said Villefort; "M. d’Epinay was quite a child when his father died, he knows very little of M. Noirtier, and will meet him, if not with pleasure, at least with indifference."
  • Danglars was quite annoyed by the young man’s indifference.
  • I may acknowledge this to a daughter whom I know to be philosophical enough to understand my indifference, and not to impute it to me as a crime.
  • But for one whose privilege it was to agitate that ocean of human waves, how many were received with a look of indifference or a sneer of disdain!
  • The dread with which the pale and motionless baroness listened to this, was equalled by the calm indifference with which Debray had spoken.
  • Noirtier seemed to be calmed by these words, and turned his eyes with indifference to the other side.
  • "His carelessness and indifference touch me to the heart," said Julie.
  • "Then that will make only 4,998 louis more," said Peppino with the same indifference.
  • The young man answered this invitation with a gesture of indifference, and stepped out of the boat; the sea immediately rose to his waist.
  • Albert retained his calm and indifferent manner; he might feel perhaps annoyed, but he knew Monte Cristo’s eye was on him.
  • The district doctor approached with the indifference of a man accustomed to spend half his time amongst the dead; he then lifted the sheet which was placed over the face, and just unclosed the lips.
  • The weight of his fallen fortunes seemed suddenly to crush him; he could not foresee the consequences; he could not contemplate the future with the indifference of the hardened criminal who merely faces a contingency already familiar.
  • You owe me nothing but some trifle of 20,000. francs, which you have been saved out of your travelling expenses, so that there is not much of a score between us;—but you must really permit me to congratulate you on the ease and unconcern with which you resigned yourself to your fate, and the perfect indifference you manifested as to the turn events might take.
  • The cousin standing at the door ushered in the guests, and it was rather a relief to the indifferent to see a person as unmoved as themselves, and who did not exact a mournful face or force tears, as would have been the case with a father, a brother, or a lover.
  • …the ballet might have claimed his attention, Franz was too deeply occupied with the beautiful Greek to take any note of it; while she seemed to experience an almost childlike delight in watching it, her eager, animated looks contrasting strongly with the utter indifference of her companion, who, during the whole time the piece lasted, never even moved, not even when the furious, crashing din produced by the trumpets, cymbals, and Chinese bells sounded their loudest from the orchestra.
  • The count made a sign to Albert and they bowed to the ladies, and took their leave, Albert perfectly indifferent to Mademoiselle Danglars’ contempt, Monte Cristo reiterating his advice to Madame Danglars on the prudence a banker’s wife should exercise in providing for the future.
  • And pressing his lips on the hand of Julie, who rushed into his arms, he extended his other hand to Emmanuel; then tearing himself from this abode of peace and happiness, he made a sign to Maximilian, who followed him passively, with the indifference which had been perceptible in him ever since the death of Valentine had so stunned him.
  • All took their places, or rather the ladies formed a circle, while the gentlemen (more indifferent to the restraints of what Boileau calls the "energetic style") commented on the feverish agitation of Andrea, on M. Danglars’ riveted attention, Eugenie’s composure, and the light and sprightly manner in which the baroness treated this important affair.
  • "I learned so much at Marseilles," replied the abbe, making a strong effort to appear indifferent; "but from the length of time that has elapsed since the death of the elder Dantes, I was unable to obtain any particulars of his end.
  • "Well, my good friend," returned the abbe, in a tone that indicated utter indifference on his part, "you are at liberty, either to speak or be silent, just as you please; for my own part, I respect your scruples and admire your sentiments; so let the matter end.
  • "Come, come," said Albert, "do not assume so much indifference.
  • "Oh, yes," replied the count; "understand me, I would fight a duel for a trifle, for an insult, for a blow; and the more so that, thanks to my skill in all bodily exercises, and the indifference to danger I have gradually acquired, I should be almost certain to kill my man.
  • "Well," said Monte Cristo in an indifferent tone, "you will do as you please, count, for you are the master of your own actions, and are the person most concerned in the matter, but if I were you, I would not divulge a word of these adventures.
  • "See," said he, "my dear friend, how God punishes the most thoughtless and unfeeling men for their indifference, by presenting dreadful scenes to their view.
  • "Oh, no, no, count," cried Maximilian, seizing the count’s hands, "pray laugh; be happy, and prove to me, by your indifference, that life is endurable to sufferers.
  • "Thank you, gentlemen," replied Albert, with a smile of indifference; "I shall follow your advice—not because you give it, but because I had before intended to quit France.

  • There are no more uses of "indifferent" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • About a third are in favor of the change, a third are opposed, and a third are indifferent.
  • Before meeting us, she felt alone in an indifferent world.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading