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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • These considerations naturally gave Villefort a feeling of such complete felicity that his mind was fairly dazzled in its contemplation.
  • He soon became calmer and more happy, for only now did he begin to realize his felicity.
  • Such felicity seems above all price—as a thing impossible and unattainable.
  • Man does not appear to me to be intended to enjoy felicity so unmixed; happiness is like the enchanted palaces we read of in our childhood, where fierce, fiery dragons defend the entrance and approach; and monsters of all shapes and kinds, requiring to be overcome ere victory is ours.

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  • A mind always employed is always happy. This is the true secret, the grand recipe, for felicity.
    Thomas Jefferson
  • There is a time when a man distinguishes the idea of felicity from the idea of wealth; it is the beginning of wisdom.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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