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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • The old man looked at her for an instant with an expression of the deepest tenderness, then, turning towards the notary, he significantly winked his eye in token of dissent.
  • It is my mother who dissents; she has a clear and penetrating judgment, and does not smile on the proposed union.
  • Mademoiselle Eugenie, however, merely returned a dissenting movement of the head, while, with a cold smile, she directed the attention of her mother to an opposite box on the first circle, in which sat the Countess G——, and where Morcerf had just made his appearance.
  • …looked upon Debray,—an expression which seemed to imply that she understood all her mother’s amorous and pecuniary relationships with the intimate secretary; moreover, she saw that Eugenie detested Debray,—not only because he was a source of dissension and scandal under the paternal roof, but because she had at once classed him in that catalogue of bipeds whom Plato endeavors to withdraw from the appellation of men, and whom Diogenes designated as animals upon two legs without…

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  • The Alien and Sedition Acts were attempts to silence early political dissent in America.
  • The Supreme Court was unanimous except for one dissenting opinion.

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