To better see all uses of the word
disdain
in
The Count of Monte Cristo
please enable javascript.

disdain
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The child stuck out his lips and turned away his head in a disdainful manner, saying, "He’s too ugly."
  • And Villefort threw disdainfully on his desk the letter Dantes had just given back to him.
  • ’—’What, then,’ said Vampa, raising his hand with a gesture of disdain, while Teresa, no longer able to restrain her alarm, clung closely to him, ’do wolves rend each other?
  • ’—Vampa smiled disdainfully at this precaution on the part of the bandit, went before Teresa, and continued to advance with the same firm and easy step as before.
  • Hermine looked at the banker with supreme disdain.
  • His forehead was marked with the line that indicates the constant presence of bitter thoughts; he had the fiery eyes that seem to penetrate to the very soul, and the haughty and disdainful upper lip that gives to the words it utters a peculiar character that impresses them on the minds of those to whom they are addressed.
  • "I am on the point of starting on a journey," replied Morrel disdainfully.
  • And Morrel dropped his head with disdainful incredulity.
  • But for one whose privilege it was to agitate that ocean of human waves, how many were received with a look of indifference or a sneer of disdain!
  • Maximilian cast a look of disdain, almost of anger, on the count.
  • Albert’s lips scarcely whispered "Good-by," but his look was more explicit; it expressed a whole poem of restrained anger, proud disdain, and generous indignation.
  • The betrothed had retired, as we said, with haughty air, disdainful lip, and the demeanor of an outraged queen, followed by her companion, who was paler and more disturbed than herself.
  • By the side of Andrea was stationed the lawyer who was to conduct his defence, and who had been appointed by the court, for Andrea disdained to pay any attention to those details, to which he appeared to attach no importance.
  • Villefort, astonished at this reply, which he by no means expected, started like a soldier who feels the blow levelled at him over the armor he wears, and a curl of his disdainful lip indicated that from that moment he noted in the tablets of his brain that the Count of Monte Cristo was by no means a highly bred gentleman.
  • Why, did not the countess, the proud Mercedes, the disdainful Catalane, who will scarcely open her lips to her oldest acquaintances, take your arm, lead you into the garden, into the private walks, and remain there for half an hour?
  • Madame Danglars had until then, perhaps, hoped for something; but when she saw the careless bow of Debray, and the glance by which it was accompanied, together with his significant silence, she raised her head, and without passion or violence or even hesitation, ran down-stairs, disdaining to address a last farewell to one who could thus part from her.
  • There remained in the banker’s house only Danglars, closeted in his study, and making his statement to the officer of gendarmes; Madame Danglars, terrified, in the boudoir with which we are acquainted; and Eugenie, who with haughty air and disdainful lip had retired to her room with her inseparable companion, Mademoiselle Louise d’Armilly.
  • …coat, unexceptional in its cut, though simple and unornamented; it was not the plain white waistcoat; it was not the trousers, that displayed the foot so perfectly formed—it was none of these things that attracted the attention,—it was his pale complexion, his waving black hair, his calm and serene expression, his dark and melancholy eye, his mouth, chiselled with such marvellous delicacy, which so easily expressed such high disdain,—these were what fixed the attention of all upon him.
  • Villefort looked disdainfully at Morrel, and replied,— "You are aware, monsieur, that a man may be estimable and trustworthy in private life, and the best seaman in the merchant service, and yet be, politically speaking, a great criminal.
  • "Poverty"— "Pshaw!" said Busoni disdainfully; "poverty may make a man beg, steal a loaf of bread at a baker’s door, but not cause him to open a secretary in a house supposed to be inhabited.

  • There are no more uses of "disdain" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
  • She has nothing but disdain for the notion that common people can regulate their own lives better than she can.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading