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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Why, when I found myself utterly destitute, I thought my old friends would, perhaps, assist me.
  • You see, I, who never did a bad action but that I have told you of—am in destitution, with my poor wife dying of fever before my very eyes, and I unable to do anything in the world for her; I shall die of hunger, as old Dantes did, while Fernand and Danglars are rolling in wealth.
  • "Sire," said Blacas, who had for a moment the hope of sacrificing Villefort to his own profit, "I am compelled to tell you that these are not mere rumors destitute of foundation which thus disquiet me; but a serious-minded man, deserving all my confidence, and charged by me to watch over the south" (the duke hesitated as he pronounced these words), "has arrived by post to tell me that a great peril threatens the king, and so I hastened to you, sire."
  • "Well, that tends to confirm my own ideas," said Franz, "that the countess’s suspicions were destitute alike of sense and reason.

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  • The article is entitled Destitute and Desperate in the Land of Plenty.
  • The worst solitude is to be destitute of sincere friendship.
    Sir Francis Bacon

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