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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • True, the planks were not so closely adjusted but that a hasty peep might be obtained through their interstices; but the strict decorum and rigid propriety of the inhabitants of the house left no grounds for apprehending that advantage would be taken of that circumstance.
  • The recent events, the solitary and eccentric position of the count, his enormous, nay, almost incredible fortune, should have made men cautious, and have altogether prevented ladies visiting a house where there was no one of their own sex to receive them; and yet curiosity had been enough to lead them to overleap the bounds of prudence and decorum.
  • "It shall be as you wish, madame," said Villefort; "more especially since your wishes coincide with mine, and as soon as M. d’Epinay arrives in Paris"— "My dear grandmother," interrupted Valentine, "consider decorum—the recent death.

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  • All decorum was lost in the classroom.
  • She insists upon decorum and civility at her meetings.

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