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apprise
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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apprise
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • Therefore, scarcely had the stranger time to pronounce his name before the count was apprised of his arrival.
  • He did seek, and has found him, apparently, since he is here now; and, finally, my friend apprised me of your coming, and gave me a few other instructions relative to your future fortune.
  • Apprised in time of the visit paid him, Monte Cristo had, from behind the blinds of his pavilion, as minutely observed the baron, by means of an excellent lorgnette, as Danglars himself had scrutinized the house, garden, and servants.
  • Half an hour will suffice to apprise them; will you go for them yourself, or shall you send?
  • However, Monte Cristo only made a sign to apprise Ali, who, understanding that danger was approaching from the other side, drew nearer to his master.
  • "You are right; it is not you who should apprise M. Danglars, it is I." "Do not do so, reverend sir."
  • The members, apprised of the sort of presentation which was to be made that evening, were all in attendance.
  • Exactly what I wish for; I will apprise my mother of my intention, and return to you.
  • I will say, likewise, he had apprised the count, by a note, of your intention, and, the count being absent, I read the note and sat up to await you.
  • The porter was in attendance; he had been apprised by the groom of the last stage of the count’s approach.
  • Chateau-Renaud was at his post; apprised by Beauchamp of the circumstances, he required no explanation from Albert.
  • You will have sufficient time before five o’clock; despatch a messenger to apprise the grooms at the first station.
  • Morrel," said Chateau-Renaud, "will you apprise the Count of Monte Cristo that M. de Morcerf is arrived, and we are at his disposal?"
  • The count opened the letter, and read:— "M. de Monte Cristo is apprised that this night a man will enter his house in the Champs-Elysees with the intention of carrying off some papers supposed to be in the secretary in the dressing-room.

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  • The President was apprised of new developments.
  • The Chamber of Commerce wants to apprise business owners of...

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