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The Count of Monte Cristo
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • "You were saying, sir"—said Fernand, awaiting with great anxiety the end of this interrupted remark.
  • Old Dantes was dying with anxiety to know what had become of Edmond.
  • Faria started: "Have you, indeed?" cried he, raising his head with quick anxiety; "pray, let me know what it is you have discovered?"
  • The sick man was not yet able to speak, but he pointed with evident anxiety towards the door.
  • It was therefore near seven o’clock; but Edmond’s anxiety had put all thoughts of time out of his head.
  • On the staircase they met a beautiful girl of sixteen or seventeen, who looked with anxiety at the stranger.
  • On the 1st, Morrel returned; he was awaited by his family with extreme anxiety, for from this journey to Paris they hoped great things.
  • "Sire," said Villefort, "I will render a faithful report to your majesty, but I must entreat your forgiveness if my anxiety leads to some obscurity in my language."
  • Which is undergoing great fatigue and anxiety, my dear duke, when we have a telegraph which transmits messages in three or four hours, and that without getting in the least out of breath.
  • Emmanuel received him; this young man was alarmed by the appearance of every new face, for every new face might be that of a new creditor, come in anxiety to question the head of the house.
  • As for his suspicions, once on terra firma, once that he had seen the indifferent, if not friendly, appearance of his hosts, his anxiety had quite disappeared, or rather, at sight of the goat, had turned to appetite.
  • Bertuccio, crouched in the corner of the carriage, began to examine with a feverish anxiety every house they passed.
  • Oh, real enough, from anxiety doubtless,—at any rate they postponed the matter for two months.
  • The major looked at the count with an indescribable expression of anxiety.
  • The major awaited the conclusion of the postscript, apparently with great anxiety.
  • "Now," said Monte Cristo "as to the mother of the young man"— "As to the mother of the young man"—repeated the Italian, with anxiety.
  • "Then," said the young man, with anxiety, "I shall be sure to be placed in an agreeable position."
  • He was intently watching for a shadow to appear among the trees, and awaiting with anxiety the sound of a light step on the gravel walk.
  • He had himself a daughter about her age, but whose life was one continued source of anxiety and fear to him from her mother having been consumptive.
  • Valentine was ignorant of the cause of this sorrow and anxiety, and as it was not his accustomed hour for visiting her, she had gone to the spot simply by accident or perhaps through sympathy.
  • Madame Danglars, in whom the events we have related had caused deep anxiety, had hesitated about going to Madame de Morcerf’s, when during the morning her carriage happened to meet that of Villefort.
  • One day, Benedetto, who had been gone from the house since morning, to our great anxiety, did not return until late in the evening, dragging a monkey after him, which he said he had found chained to the foot of a tree.
  • A cloud settled on his brow, evincing decided anxiety and uneasiness, instead of the expression of offended pride which had lately reigned there.
  • "So much the better; yet you have something to tell me?" replied the count with increased anxiety.
  • I must reach Compiegne to-night, or I shall cause deep anxiety to my family.
  • A pallor overspread the young man’s forehead, and he looked around him with anxiety.
  • The count’s anxiety was manifested by a bright color which seldom appeared on the face of that imperturbable man.
  • Come, ease me of my anxiety, or else frighten me at once.
  • "Well?" asked Madame Danglars, with an anxiety easy to be understood.
  • He resolved to end his anxiety.
  • Five minutes after the door-keeper again appeared; all eyes were fixed on the door, and I," said Beauchamp, "shared the general expectation and anxiety.
  • The assizes, also, were about to begin, and Villefort, shut up in his room, exerted himself with feverish anxiety in drawing up the case against the murderer of Caderousse.
  • Almost before the key had turned in the lock, and before the departing steps of the jailer had died away in the long corridor he had to traverse, Dantes, whose restless anxiety concerning his friend left him no desire to touch the food brought him, hurried back to the abbe’s chamber, and raising the stone by pressing his head against it, was soon beside the sick man’s couch.
  • "Count," said Emmanuel, when they were at the end of the Place Royale, "put me down at my door, that my wife may not have a single moment of needless anxiety on my account or yours."
  • As he passed by M. Noirtier’s room, he perceived two figures through the half-open door; but he experienced no curiosity to know who was visiting his father: anxiety carried him on further.
  • He had not been more than ten minutes in the drawing-room before he drew Danglars aside into the recess of a bow-window, and, after an ingenious preamble, related to him all his anxieties and cares since his noble father’s departure.
  • The piercing eye of Monte Cristo glanced through clusters of bushes and trees, and was soon relieved from all anxiety, for seeing a shadow glide between the yew-trees, Monte Cristo recognized him whom he sought.

  • There are no more uses of "anxiety" in the book.

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  • She suffers from more than the usual pre-test anxiety.
  • It is a vicious cycle in which worry leads to a drop in the stock market and the drop in the stock market leads to increased anxiety.

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