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accost
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The Count of Monte Cristo
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accost
Used In
The Count of Monte Cristo
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  • The Englishman, with the coolness of his nation, addressed him in terms nearly similar to those with which he had accosted the mayor of Marseilles.
  • He went gayly up to the sailors, who rose as soon as they perceived him; and the patron, accosting him, said, "The Signor Sinbad has left his compliments for your excellency, and desires us to express the regret he feels at not being able to take his leave in person; but he trusts you will excuse him, as very important business calls him to Malaga."
  • D’Avrigny accosted the priest.
  • Morrel hesitated for a moment; he feared it would be hypocritical to accost in a friendly manner the man whom he was tacitly opposing, but his oath and the gravity of the circumstances recurred to his memory; he struggled to conceal his emotion and bowed to Franz.
  • Morcerf, usually so stiff and formal, accosted the banker in an affable and smiling manner, and, feeling sure that the overture he was about make would be well received, he did not consider it necessary to adopt any manoeuvres in order to gain his end, but went at once straight to the point.

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    Show samples from other sources
  • He accosted me with excessive warmth, for he had been drinking much.
    Edgar Allan Poe  --  The Cask of Amontillado
  • A few blocks from home, he was accosted by two robbers.
    Mitch Albom  --  Tuesdays with Morrie

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