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melancholy
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
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melancholy
Used In
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
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  • all gladness left him and a deep melancholy settled down upon his spirit.
  • The boy’s soul was steeped in melancholy; his feelings were in happy accord with his surroundings.
  • And then there came, mingling with his half-formed dreams, a most melancholy caterwauling.
  • Yet notwithstanding all this, the boy grew more and more melancholy and pale and dejected.
  • Huck was melancholy, too.
  • In the afternoon Becky Thatcher found herself moping about the deserted schoolhouse yard, and feeling very melancholy.
  • Then arose a slim, melancholy girl, whose face had the "interesting" paleness that comes of pills and indigestion, and read a "poem."
  • When he got upon his feet at last and moved feebly down-town, a melancholy change had come over everything and every creature.
  • Huck was sitting on the gunwale of a flatboat, listlessly dangling his feet in the water and looking very melancholy.
  • Aunt Polly had drooped into a settled melancholy, and her gray hair had grown almost white.
  • Huck’s face lost its tranquil content, and took a melancholy cast.
  • Becky resumed her picture inspections with Alfred, but as the minutes dragged along and no Tom came to suffer, her triumph began to cloud and she lost interest; gravity and absent-mindedness followed, and then melancholy; two or three times she pricked up her ear at a footstep, but it was a false hope; no Tom came.
  • "Friendship" was one; "Memories of Other Days"; "Religion in History"; "Dream Land"; "The Advantages of Culture"; "Forms of Political Government Compared and Contrasted"; "Melancholy"; "Filial Love"; "Heart Longings," etc., etc. A prevalent feature in these compositions was a nursed and petted melancholy; another was a wasteful and opulent gush of "fine language"; another was a tendency to lug in by the ears particularly prized words and phrases until they were worn entirely out; and a…
  • …in History"; "Dream Land"; "The Advantages of Culture"; "Forms of Political Government Compared and Contrasted"; "Melancholy"; "Filial Love"; "Heart Longings," etc., etc. A prevalent feature in these compositions was a nursed and petted melancholy; another was a wasteful and opulent gush of "fine language"; another was a tendency to lug in by the ears particularly prized words and phrases until they were worn entirely out; and a peculiarity that conspicuously marked and marred them…

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  • Since her dog died she’s been in a melancholy mood.
  • This weather makes me melancholy. I can’t wait for spring,

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