To see all instances of the word
deduction
used in
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
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deduction
Used in
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
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  • I could not help laughing at the ease with which he explained his process of deduction.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • “We have got to the deductions and the inferences,” said Lestrade, winking at me.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I am afraid, Holmes, that you are not very practical with your deductions and your inferences.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You see, Watson, our little deductions have suddenly assumed a much more important and less innocent aspect.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Pshaw, my dear fellow, what do the public, the great unobservant public, who could hardly tell a weaver by his tooth or a compositor by his left thumb, care about the finer shades of analysis and deduction!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot-slitting specimen of the London slavey.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Now, when you see that a young lady, otherwise neatly dressed, has come away from home with odd boots, half-buttoned, it is no great deduction to say that she came away in a hurry.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In the latter, as may be remembered, Sherlock Holmes was able, by winding up the dead man’s watch, to prove that it had been wound up two hours before, and that therefore the deceased had gone to bed within that time—a deduction which was of the greatest importance in clearing up the case.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I had no keener pleasure than in following Holmes in his professional investigations, and in admiring the rapid deductions, as swift as intuitions, and yet always founded on a logical basis with which he unravelled the problems which were submitted to him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • …that you have so far grasped this truth that in these little records of our cases which you have been good enough to draw up, and, I am bound to say, occasionally to embellish, you have given prominence not so much to the many causes célèbres and sensational trials in which I have figured but rather to those incidents which may have been trivial in themselves, but which have given room for those faculties of deduction and of logical synthesis which I have made my special province.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: deduction from the bill
as in: logical deduction
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