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Sherlock Holmes
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
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Sherlock Holmes
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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
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  • The house was just such as I had pictured it from Sherlock Holmes’ succinct description, but the locality appeared to be less private than I expected.
  • He was searching his pockets for the key when someone passing said: "Good-night, Mister Sherlock Holmes."
  • "You have really got it!" he cried, grasping Sherlock Holmes by either shoulder and looking eagerly into his face.
  • Sherlock Holmes staggered back, white with chagrin and surprise.
  • The photograph was of Irene Adler herself in evening dress, the letter was superscribed to "Sherlock Holmes, Esq. To be left till called for."
  • Well, I followed you to your door, and so made sure that I was really an object of interest to the celebrated Mr. Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes’ quick eye took in my occupation, and he shook his head with a smile as he noticed my questioning glances.
  • "What is the name of this obliging youth?" asked Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes stopped in front of it with his head on one side and looked it all over, with his eyes shining brightly between puckered lids.
  • I trust that I am not more dense than my neighbours, but I was always oppressed with a sense of my own stupidity in my dealings with Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes was not very communicative during the long drive and lay back in the cab humming the tunes which he had heard in the afternoon.
  • Sherlock Holmes had sprung out and seized the intruder by the collar.
  • "Why did you come away to consult me in such a hurry?" asked Sherlock Holmes, with his finger-tips together and his eyes to the ceiling.
  • Sherlock Holmes clapped his hands softly together and chuckled.
  • I found Sherlock Holmes alone, however, half asleep, with his long, thin form curled up in the recesses of his armchair.
  • "I hope we may clear him, Miss Turner," said Sherlock Holmes.
  • It was late before Sherlock Holmes returned.
  • Sherlock Holmes was transformed when he was hot upon such a scent as this.
  • Sherlock Holmes took a folded paper from his pocket and flattened it out on the table.
  • I never hear of such a case as this that I do not think of Baxter’s words, and say, ’There, but for the grace of God, goes Sherlock Holmes.’
  • And that was how a great scandal threatened to affect the kingdom of Bohemia, and how the best plans of Mr. Sherlock Holmes were beaten by a woman’s wit.
  • Sherlock Holmes was pacing up and down the platform, his tall, gaunt figure made even gaunter and taller by his long grey travelling-cloak and close-fitting cloth cap.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat silent for a few minutes with his fingertips still pressed together, his legs stretched out in front of him, and his gaze directed upward to the ceiling.
  • I had expected to see Sherlock Holmes impatient under this rambling and inconsequential narrative, but, on the contrary, he had listened with the greatest concentration of attention.
  • THE RED-HEADED LEAGUE I had called upon my friend, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, one day in the autumn of last year and found him in deep conversation with a very stout, florid-faced, elderly gentleman with fiery red hair.
  • I did not wonder at Lestrade’s opinion, and yet I had so much faith in Sherlock Holmes’ insight that I could not lose hope as long as every fresh fact seemed to strengthen his conviction of young McCarthy’s innocence.
  • Sherlock Holmes and I surveyed this curt announcement and the rueful face behind it, until the comical side of the affair so completely overtopped every other consideration that we both burst out into a roar of laughter.
  • Sherlock Holmes welcomed her with the easy courtesy for which he was remarkable, and, having closed the door and bowed her into an armchair, he looked her over in the minute and yet abstracted fashion which was peculiar to him.
  • Sherlock Holmes was wrong in his conjecture, however, for there came a step in the passage and a tapping at the door.
  • "Tut! tut!" cried Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat for some time in silence, with his head sunk forward and his eyes bent upon the red glow of the fire.
  • Sherlock Holmes closed his eyes and placed his elbows upon the arms of his chair, with his finger-tips together.
  • "Have you never—" said Sherlock Holmes, bending forward and sinking his voice—"have you never heard of the Ku Klux Klan?"
  • Sherlock Holmes was already at breakfast when I came down.
  • Sherlock Holmes had not come back yet.
  • In a very short time a decrepit figure had emerged from the opium den, and I was walking down the street with Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes seemed to be embarrassed by the question.
  • Sherlock Holmes sprang out of his chair as if he had been galvanised.
  • Sherlock Holmes was well known to the force, and the two constables at the door saluted him.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat down beside him on the couch and patted him kindly on the shoulder.
  • "No, no. No crime," said Sherlock Holmes, laughing.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat up with a whistle.
  • Sherlock Holmes glanced sharply across at me with a slight shrug of his shoulders.
  • Sherlock Holmes looked deeply chagrined.
  • My name is Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes hailed a four-wheeler which was passing.
  • There was a long silence, broken only by his heavy breathing and by the measured tapping of Sherlock Holmes’ finger-tips upon the edge of the table.
  • It was early in April in the year ’83 that I woke one morning to find Sherlock Holmes standing, fully dressed, by the side of my bed.
  • My name is Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes ran her over with one of his quick, all-comprehensive glances.
  • "And what do you think of it all, Watson?" asked Sherlock Holmes, leaning back in his chair.
  • It was nearly one o’clock when Sherlock Holmes returned from his excursion.
  • Sherlock Holmes and I had no difficulty in engaging a bedroom and sitting-room at the Crown Inn.
  • The little which I had yet to learn of the case was told me by Sherlock Holmes as we travelled back next day.
  • Sherlock Holmes laughed.
  • It was difficult to refuse any of Sherlock Holmes’ requests, for they were always so exceedingly definite, and put forward with such a quiet air of mastery.
  • Sherlock Holmes had been leaning back in his chair with his eyes closed and his head sunk in a cushion, but he half opened his lids now and glanced across at his visitor.
  • ADVENTURE V. THE FIVE ORANGE PIPS When I glance over my notes and records of the Sherlock Holmes cases between the years ’82 and ’90, I am faced by so many which present strange and interesting features that it is no easy matter to know which to choose and which to leave.
  • THE ADVENTURE OF THE BLUE CARBUNCLE I had called upon my friend Sherlock Holmes upon the second morning after Christmas, with the intention of wishing him the compliments of the season.
  • In the latter, as may be remembered, Sherlock Holmes was able, by winding up the dead man’s watch, to prove that it had been wound up two hours before, and that therefore the deceased had gone to bed within that time—a deduction which was of the greatest importance in clearing up the case.
  • Sherlock Holmes had opened his mouth to reply, when the door flew open, and Peterson, the commissionaire, rushed into the apartment with flushed cheeks and the face of a man who is dazed with astonishment.
  • He had turned his back so that none could see him but I. His form had filled out, his wrinkles were gone, the dull eyes had regained their fire, and there, sitting by the fire and grinning at my surprise, was none other than Sherlock Holmes.
  • Then Sherlock Holmes pulled down from the shelf one of the ponderous commonplace books in which he placed his cuttings.
  • There were Sherlock Holmes, the hydraulic engineer, Inspector Bradstreet, of Scotland Yard, a plain-clothes man, and myself.
  • "It is very good of Lord St. Simon to honour my head by putting it on a level with his own," said Sherlock Holmes, laughing.
  • Sherlock Holmes leaned back in his chair and laughed heartily.
  • Just before nine o’clock Sherlock Holmes stepped briskly into the room.
  • "Then I trust that you at least will honour me with your company," said Sherlock Holmes.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat silent for some few minutes, with his brows knitted and his eyes fixed upon the fire.
  • Sherlock Holmes took it up and opened the bureau.
  • "There is one other thing you owe, Mr. Holder," said Sherlock Holmes rather sternly.
  • Miss Hunter screamed and shrunk against the wall at the sight of him, but Sherlock Holmes sprang forward and confronted him.
  • "Now, Mr. Sherlock Holmes," said the lady as we entered a well-lit dining-room, upon the table of which a cold supper had been laid out, "I should very much like to ask you one or two plain questions, to which I beg that you will give a plain answer."
  • While Sherlock Holmes had been detailing this singular series of events, we had been whirling through the outskirts of the great town until the last straggling houses had been left behind, and we rattled along with a country hedge upon either side of us.
  • It was after five o’clock when Sherlock Holmes left me, but I had no time to be lonely, for within an hour there arrived a confectioner’s man with a very large flat box.
  • Sherlock Holmes pushed him down into the easy-chair and, sitting beside him, patted his hand and chatted with him in the easy, soothing tones which he knew so well how to employ.
  • Sherlock Holmes was a man, however, who, when he had an unsolved problem upon his mind, would go for days, and even for a week, without rest, turning it over, rearranging his facts, looking at it from every point of view until he had either fathomed it or convinced himself that his data were insufficient.
  • "Ha!" cried I, "if it is anything in the nature of a problem which you desire to see solved, I should strongly recommend you to come to my friend, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, before you go to the official police."
  • THE ADVENTURE OF THE ENGINEER’S THUMB Of all the problems which have been submitted to my friend, Mr. Sherlock Holmes, for solution during the years of our intimacy, there were only two which I was the means of introducing to his notice—that of Mr. Hatherley’s thumb, and that of Colonel Warburton’s madness.
  • Sherlock Holmes sat moodily at one side of the fireplace cross-indexing his records of crime, while I at the other was deep in one of Clark Russell’s fine sea-stories until the howl of the gale from without seemed to blend with the text, and the splash of the rain to lengthen out into the long swash of the sea waves.
  • Sherlock Holmes had been silent all the morning, dipping continuously into the advertisement columns of a succession of papers until at last, having apparently given up his search, he had emerged in no very sweet temper to lecture me upon my literary shortcomings.
  • As I have reason to believe, however, that the full facts have never been revealed to the general public, and as my friend Sherlock Holmes had a considerable share in clearing the matter up, I feel that no memoir of him would be complete without some little sketch of this remarkable episode.
  • Sherlock Holmes was, as I expected, lounging about his sitting-room in his dressing-gown, reading the agony column of The Times and smoking his before-breakfast pipe, which was composed of all the plugs and dottles left from his smokes of the day before, all carefully dried and collected on the corner of the mantelpiece.
  • THE ADVENTURE OF THE SPECKLED BAND On glancing over my notes of the seventy odd cases in which I have during the last eight years studied the methods of my friend Sherlock Holmes, I find many tragic, some comic, a large number merely strange, but none commonplace; for, working as he did rather for the love of his art than for the acquirement of wealth, he refused to associate himself with any investigation which did not tend towards the unusual, and even the fantastic.
  • Sherlock Holmes, I believe?" said she.
  • It was dated at midnight of the preceding night and ran in this way: "MY DEAR MR. SHERLOCK HOLMES,—You really did it very well.
  • It was from Sherlock Holmes and ran in this way: "Have you a couple of days to spare?
  • I think that the change would do you good, and you are always so interested in Mr. Sherlock Holmes’ cases."
  • "I think you will find," said Sherlock Holmes, "that you will play for a higher stake to-night than you have ever done yet, and that the play will be more exciting.
  • "Well, it is just as I have been telling you, Mr. Sherlock Holmes," said Jabez Wilson, mopping his forehead; "I have a small pawnbroker’s business at Coburg Square, near the City.
  • "Oh, Mr. Sherlock Holmes!" she cried, glancing from one to the other of us, and finally, with a woman’s quick intuition, fastening upon my companion, "I am so glad that you have come.
  • A CASE OF IDENTITY "My dear fellow," said Sherlock Holmes as we sat on either side of the fire in his lodgings at Baker Street, "life is infinitely stranger than anything which the mind of man could invent.
  • This is what he says: " ’MY DEAR MR. SHERLOCK HOLMES:—Lord Backwater tells me that I may place implicit reliance upon your judgment and discretion.
  • THE ADVENTURE OF THE COPPER BEECHES "To the man who loves art for its own sake," remarked Sherlock Holmes, tossing aside the advertisement sheet of the Daily Telegraph, "it is frequently in its least important and lowliest manifestations that the keenest pleasure is to be derived.
  • I leave a photograph which he might care to possess; and I remain, dear Mr. Sherlock Holmes, "Very truly yours, "IRENE NORTON, née ADLER."

  • There are no more uses of "Sherlock Holmes" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • In high school I read some Sherlock Holmes and laughed to see that this was the same battle where Dr. Watson was wounded before becoming partner to the great detective.
    Malala Yousafzai  --  I Am Malala
  • It looked like Sherlock Holmes’s pipe, curved and drooping from her lips.
    Ransom Riggs  --  Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

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