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deference
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Oliver Twist
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deference
Used In
Oliver Twist
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  • ’My dear,’ said Mr. Sowerberry, deferentially, ’this is the boy from the workhouse that I told you of.’
  • Mr. Bumble stopped not to converse with the small shopkeepers and others who spoke to him, deferentially, as he passed along.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Sowerberry—the shop being shut up—were taking their supper in the little back-parlour, when Mr. Sowerberry, after several deferential glances at his wife, said, ’My dear—’
  • Oliver thought the old gentleman must be a decided miser to live in such a dirty place, with so many watches; but, thinking that perhaps his fondness for the Dodger and the other boys, cost him a good deal of money, he only cast a deferential look at the Jew, and asked if he might get up.
  • Mr. Chitling was older in years than the Dodger: having perhaps numbered eighteen winters; but there was a degree of deference in his deportment towards that young gentleman which seemed to indicate that he felt himself conscious of a slight inferiority in point of genius and professional aquirements.

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  • They changed their strategy in deference to the President’s wishes.
  • Out of deference for the Hindu visitors, they did not serve beef.

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