To better see all uses of the word
Oliver Twist
please enable javascript.

Used In
Oliver Twist
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • The very rats, which here and there lay putrefying in its rottenness, were hideous with famine.
  • As the wretched creature mumbled and chuckled in her hideous merriment, the undertaker turned to go away.
  • ’Aha!’ said the Jew, shrugging up his shoulders, and distorting every feature with a hideous grin.
  • The Jew, smiling hideously, patted Oliver on the head, and said, that if he kept himself quiet, and applied himself to business, he saw they would be very good friends yet.
  • ’If you please, mistress,’ said a withered old female pauper, hideously ugly: putting her head in at the door, ’Old Sally is a-going fast.’
  • There sat the hideous old man, in his accustomed corner, pointing at him, and whispering to another man, with his face averted, who sat beside him.
  • As he glided stealthily along, creeping beneath the shelter of the walls and doorways, the hideous old man seemed like some loathsome reptile, engendered in the slime and darkness through which he moved: crawling forth, by night, in search of some rich offal for a meal.
  • The man got no further, for Sikes with a hideous imprecation overthrew the table, and tearing the hat from him, burst out of the house.
  • It was like sitting in a vault strewn with dead bodies—the cap, the noose, the pinioned arms, the faces that he knew, even beneath that hideous veil.
  • Everything told of life and animation, but one dark cluster of objects in the centre of all—the black stage, the cross-beam, the rope, and all the hideous apparatus of death.
  • …and squeaking of pigs, the cries of hawkers, the shouts, oaths, and quarrelling on all sides; the ringing of bells and roar of voices, that issued from every public-house; the crowding, pushing, driving, beating, whooping and yelling; the hideous and discordant din that resounded from every corner of the market; and the unwashed, unshaven, squalid, and dirty figures constantly running to and fro, and bursting in and out of the throng; rendered it a stunning and bewildering scene,…
  • …day-break; that time which in the autumn of the year, may be truly called the dead of night; when the streets are silent and deserted; when even sounds appear to slumber, and profligacy and riot have staggered home to dream; it was at this still and silent hour, that Fagin sat watching in his old lair, with face so distorted and pale, and eyes so red and blood-shot, that he looked less like a man, than like some hideous phantom, moist from the grave, and worried by an evil spirit.
  • …son, coward, liar,—you, who hold your councils with thieves and murderers in dark rooms at night,—you, whose plots and wiles have brought a violent death upon the head of one worth millions such as you,—you, who from your cradle were gall and bitterness to your own father’s heart, and in whom all evil passions, vice, and profligacy, festered, till they found a vent in a hideous disease which had made your face an index even to your mind—you, Edward Leeford, do you still brave me!’

  • There are no more uses of "hideous" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • The beast had hideous fangs.
  • He had a hideous scar running from his forehead to his jaw.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading